Conference By Track

KEYNOTES

Monday, October 8, 2018  |  8:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Welcome Ceremony & Opening Keynote

Join us to kick off your 2018 Symposium with our opening ceremonies and keynote. The opening keynote will be announced in May 2018. Please check back then for more details.

KEYNOTES

Tuesday, October 9, 2018  |  9:15 AM - 10:30 AM

Keynote

The keynote will be announced in July 2018. Please check back then for more details.

KEYNOTES

Wednesday, October 10, 2018  |  11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Closing Keynote

End your Symposium Experience with our closing keynote. The keynote will be announced in June 2018. Please check back then for details.
Track A
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

A01: Practice Makes Perfect: Defining the Value of Simulation Centers

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Zachary Benedict
Principal, MKM architecture + design
 
Jeremy Fortier, PMP CHC LEED AP
Regional Manager – Planning Design and Construction, Ascension - Medxcel
Matt Sparling, AIA, LEED AP
Principal, MKM architecture + design
Bruce Williams, MS, MSN, RN, CHSOS, CHSE
Director of Simulation, St. Vincent Ascension Hospital

This summer Ascension Health, one of the country’s largest healthcare systems, will open the William K. Nasser, MD Healthcare Education and Simulation Center at St. Vincent in Indianapolis, IN. As simulation-based training for clinical teams becomes standard practice for many health professionals, particularly in training interdisciplinary teams, this new facility hopes to ensure that physicians and nurses are provided with an exceptional level of education through simulated procedures and team-building exercises. In discussing the preliminary planning, conceptual design, and innovative operational model for the center, this presentation is intended to provide a detailed case study of this new facility and its ability to impact patient care and staff retention/recruitment. Project administrators and architects will review initial research and share lessons learned to provide a comprehensive summary of the project from initial planning to current operation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Articulate the challenges facing Ascension Health and the role simulation centers could play as the organization looks to the future.
2. Present research assessing the value simulation centers can provide healthcare systems regarding patient care, innovation, retention, and recruitment.
3. Present a chronological case study for the William K. Nasser, MD Healthcare Education and Simulation Center at St. Vincent in Indianapolis, IN.
4. Examine data measuring the impact the simulation center has had on Ascension operations and lessons learned following the completion of the project.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

A02: Activating Multiple Programs for Multiple Customers on One Campus

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Timothy Brosnan, MHA
Vice President, Planning and Community Relations, Palos Community Hospital
 
Nick Faulconer, LEED AP BD+C
Project Manager, The Walsh Group – Walsh Construction & Archer Western
Sandra McCullough, RN, MBA
Director Ambulatory & Practice Development, Loyola University Health System
 
Drew Peterson
Program Manager, The Walsh Group - Walsh Logistics

As one of the few remaining independent community hospitals in Chicagoland, Palos Community Hospital developed a partnership with Loyola University Medical Center to best serve the community while positioning itself for long term survival and independence in a competitive marketplace. The hospital intends to accomplish this with a new focus on outpatient care to deliver the right care, at the right place, at the right time, and at the right price. With no time to waste the hospital reached out to new partners and an integrated design build and outfitting approach to accelerate the delivery of its revamped facility and strategy as quickly as possible.  

 

Presentation focuses on three specialized programs with similar outcomes – activating the customer in their new space on time and on budget with users that were prepared to operate on Day 1.  Case studies include a center for cancer care and research, Radiology Department and a new Ambulatory Care Center with the following departments Radiation Oncology Clinic, Surgery Center and specialty clinic.

 

Through the evolution of this program, the processes and team never wavered, not only delivering the construction project on time and on budget, but also ensured the building was prepared for our customer and the customer was prepared for the building.    

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Demonstrate how a consistent focus on activation allowed the multiple customers to GO LIVE on Day 1.
2. Determine how the strategic needs of the hospital, community, and partnerships were combined in a lean process
3. Understand how a collaborative approach guided the ‘C Suite’ to make informed and timely decisions when selecting all furnishings, fixtures and equipment.
4. Demonstrate how the integrated activation and transition process provided a path for the Owner to confidently operate in their facility immediately after construction completion.

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

A03: The New Benchmark for Children's Outpatient Centers

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Will Gaither
Senior Project Manager, McCarthy
 
Bruce Komiske
V.P., Erlanger Medical Center
 
Dan Luhrs - AIA
Project Architect, HKS
Don Mueller - FACHE
CEO, Children''s Hospital

The 100,000 sq. ft. Children's Outpatient Center in Chattanooga TN. may not be the biggest or most expensive, but it combines best practices and innovative approaches to create a new benchmark that may provide a different approach for others to consider.  Some of the unique elements include:
- A competitive selection process for the design construction team that involved the entire City
- An innovative and unique exterior that clearly reflects the region
- A project that inspired the community to provide 2/3 of the project cost through philanthropy
- A healing environment that embraced the unique elements of the community to include: a 1891 Steam   
   Engine, a City Fire Truck, an 1940 Tow Truck with a personality and a "Secret Garden", all donated by the 
   community.
- A unique mock up that had three lives
- A model for efficiency - no private offices - on stage  / off stage - ultimate flexibility
- A project that has inspired over a billion dollars in future investment in the City

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Inspire future projects to do something different that will enhance the ultimate outcome and success of the project.
2. Appreciate the value of engaging an entire city in the selection of the team, the planning, design, funding and construction.
3. Transform the patient  / visitor experience into a series of unexpected and enjoyable opportunities.
4. Recognize the importance of creating an inspiring and efficient space.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A04: Retailing Healthcare - integrating specialty care in"retail" settings

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Brad Earl, AIA
Managing Principal, Healthcare Studio, NELSON
JoAnn Magnatta
Sr. Vice President, Real Estate, Facilities Design & Construction, Main Line Health System

The Affordable Care Act has changed the focus of the delivery of care for health systems across America. Patient Outcomes are more important than ever, as hospitals are judged (and paid) for their specific performance. Centers for Health and Wellness allow patients (and potential future patients) to have greater control over their personal health, through understanding and management of specifically developed program of physical exercise, medical education and nutrition. Coupled with Urgent Care, Specialty Care and Primary Care services, these convenient "Stay Well" hubs become the advance guard for well-care delivery.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Hear the Case study for both Main Line Health's Regional Mall Model and their new freestanding Specialty Wellness Center.
2. See the market growth of almost any healthcare service by colocation in a Retail Mall setting.
3. Understand the positive impact on both the Community's overall health and the health system's patient satisfaction rating.
4. Discuss the steps taken with Real Estate brokers, Mall Developer/Operators, Health System's Strategic Thinkers and Business Development executives.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

A05: Fiat Lux: Aspirational Headlines in 2007 / Real Headlines in 2017

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Annie Coull
Vice President, Stantec Architecture, Inc
 
J. Stuart Eckblad, FAIA
VP, Major Capital Construction Projects, UCSF Health

‘Let there be light’ – Fiat Lux – is the motto of the University of California. In 2007, a competition was held to select the design team for the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay which was to open exactly 8 years later. One design team considered UCSF’S aspirations for the new campus and wrote a newsletter, Fiat Lux, envisioning the headlines and stories that would be published about the Medical Center on January 22, 2018, 3 years after its opening. UCSF’s vision for Advancing Health Worldwide was reflected in Fiat Lux with focus on the excellence of programs for children, women and cancer, and the engagement of community and cultural institutions. Fast forward to January 2018. If published today, what would Fiat Lux say about the Medical Center? In a world of constant and precipitous change, which predictions were realized and how did the built environment accommodate UCSF’s evolving vision for innovation in medicine in its own community and beyond?

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify the changes in healthcare, including technology, that impacted the early concepts
2. Explore how project delivery affected the final design and construction
3. Share what we learned about implementing the early concepts-what was our reality?
4. Describe the competition/contradiction of goals and impact to operations?

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

A06: American College of Healthcare Architects Exam Prep Seminar

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
R. Gregg Moon, AIA, ACHA, EDAC
Client Leader - Healthcare, Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam, Inc

ACHA’s professional credential in healthcare architecture is the only specialty certification program recognized by the AIA. This workshop will provide healthcare architects with useful information to submit their credentials and prepare for the ACHA Exam. The seminar covers: application materials, exam topics, sample questions, scoring criteria and exam schedules.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

A07: Designing Experience: Total Health Starts Before Site Selection

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Sumrien Ali
Consulting Project Manager, JLL Employee supporting Kaiser Permanente
Mike Bellamy, PE
Director of Capital Projects, Kaiser Permanente

How can healthcare providers improve their patients’ experience? This is a hot topic in today’s fiercely competitive healthcare market where patients have more choice. The most innovative companies in the market understand the need to prioritize customer experience above all else. When Gensler partnered with JLL and Kaiser Permanente to investigate potential sites for a new MOB, our prior partnerships had well prepared the team to go beyond a typical feasibility exercise. In addition to evaluating the highest and best use of real estate to maximize Kaiser’s touchpoints within the community, the scope included anticipating and quantifying how well a site would contribute to a positive patient experience. Kaiser’s commitment to improving their patients’ experience is exemplified by their Total Health Environment initiative, which permeates every decision that is made. But when the design has not yet begun, and the several locations are being considered, how to evaluate something as subjective as the possibility for a positive and improved patient experience becomes the challenge. It also presents an exciting opportunity to carefully evaluate the essence of the question, at all scales of project delivery and design.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. A participant will be able to give examples of elements of positive patient / user experience that relate to a facility master plan.
2. A participant will learn how to organize a series of subjective ideals in a manner that can be quantified for comparison and evaluation.
3. The participant will be able to utilize examples given in this presentation to establish their own goals for preliminary project analysis.
4. A participant will be able to recognize how designing for clear circulation will impact patient experience and positive outcomes.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

A08: Organizational Factors and the Transition to Decentralized Nursing

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Dr. Jeri Brittin
Public Health Research Scientist, HDR
Francesqca Jimenez
Researcher, HDR
Melinda Kentfield, RN, BSN, MSAS
Director of Nursing/Hospitalists/Interim Chief Nurse Executive, Fremont Health
Lori Schoenholz, MSN, RN
Senior Director of Nursing Informatics, Great Plains Health

Inpatient unit designs with decentralized caregiver workstations have become popular for new and renovated hospital facilities. Traditionally, inpatient units had a single, centralized nursing station, while newer decentralized models include a range of designs that place nurses closer to patients. Current evidence evaluating these decentralized models produced mixed results and gives little focus to the substantial organizational change inherent to the transition to decentralized nursing. HDR Research conducted a mixed methods study of two Nebraska community hospitals that recently transitioned to a decentralized nursing model. The aims were to explore, document and compare nurses’ experience of the decentralized nursing environment and the accompanying change management within the organizations. The success of a transition to decentralized nursing in part depends on nurses’ acceptance of, and preparation for, the organizational change concomitant to the decentralized design.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Summarize and synthesize the current research evidence on decentralized nursing models and change management in healthcare settings.
2. Interpret the results and implications of an empirical study of two community hospitals that transitioned to a decentralized caregiving model.
3. Discuss the importance of the change management process among nurse and nurse leaders transitioning to decentralized caregiving.
4. Apply lessons and recommendations learned from two community hospitals that recently transitioned to decentralized caregiving.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

A09: Herding Cats? Strategies to align stakeholders for successful projects

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Robert Corson, AIA
Facilities Architect & Planning, Exeter Hospital
Leigh Snow, AIA, EDAC
Principal, Director of Planning, SmithGroup
 
Alison Faecher, IIDA, EDAC, LEED AP
Principal Interior Design, SmithGroup

Design projects can often feel like herding cats. Exeter Hospital wanted to avoid this as they embarked on redesigning their inpatient experience. “Exeter 2020” is a multidisciplinary team-building process intended to make the future design project more efficient & effective.

The purpose of this predesign effort was to: 
•Create a team of stakeholders with a shared language, commitment & knowledge base to drive the design & serve as ambassadors to the rest of the hospital
•Encourage cross-disciplinary discussions that will help eliminate silos
•Develop consensus on the most important problems to solve
•Collaboratively explore solutions
•Define a project road map to proceed with an inclusive, successful design project

The team led a series of workshops using a lean learning framework that allowed for a deep analysis of the hospital’s current state & unified vision for the future state.This work developed a shared mindset that serves as the foundation for a successful design project.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Recognize the value of developing a multidisciplinary design team that has a shared language, commitment and knowledge base.
2. Understand the importance of developing a shared mindset and implementing cultural change in advance of your design project.
3. Learn how to apply the elements of a holistic, lean driven problem-solving process.
4. Explore how various lean techniques can be utilized to develop a project road map for informed design.
 

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

A10: New Requirements NFPA 101 Are you taking advantage of the new criteria?

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Michael A. Crowley, PE, FSFPE, FASHE
Vice President, Jensen Hughes

CMS, The Joint Commission, DNV and other deemed status organizations are using a newer edition of NFPA 101. In 2016 CMS adopted new rules and new Life Safety requirements. In many cases the requirements have been reduced, clarified or removed. This presentation will summarize the major updates that have design impact. New criteria for rehabilitation projects will require actions for all construction projects in existing facilities. Opportunities to reduce requirements and allow new design solutions will be discussed.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Summarize the adoption process and the adopted Codes
2. Recognize the design advantages for suites, travel distance and non patient care suites
3. Describe the new criteria for Rehabilitation Projects. Chapter 43 criteria describes the upgrades required for construction rehabilitation projects.
4. Discuss the impact of CMS or Deemed Status Organizations on your Owners / Clients

Track B
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

B01: Patients First - How do we utilize design to make this happen

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Shannon Faulhaber
Director Strategic Growth, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic
 
Samuel Lasky, AIA LEED AP
Associate Principal, William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc.
 
Jennifer L. Storey, AIA, EDAC
Senior Associate, Stantec Architecture

When patients enter a healthcare facility for the first time they are often overwhelmed, adding a cancer diagnosis may result in confusion. Following the Cleveland Clinic’s guiding principle of “Patients First” we designed the Taussig Cancer Institute to be a welcoming environment while maintaining a professional clinical healing space that minimized confusion for new patients. Benefiting from the cancer institute’s patient advocate group, Voice of the Patient Advisory Council (VPAC), we understood the concerns from the patient’s perspective during the design process. We will share how this knowledge effected the overall building. How this information shaped the flow thru the space as well as the locations and adjacency of spaces. It also determined the location of many amenities that patients and families may not realize are available to them without being afforded a visual connection.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Developing an awareness of available amenities and services through building design
2. Creating an open, easily accessible and welcoming environment
3. Ability to utilize daylight and views for wayfinding and orientation within the building
4. Value of involving patients in the design of their space

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

B02: The Next Frontier: Sustainable Medical Equipment

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Joshua Kelly BS, RCDD
Senior Associate and Technology Team Leader, Mazzetti+GBA
 
Cynthia Mercante
Associate Principal, Mazzetti+GBA

Mazzetti provided the engineering services for the Stanford Children’s Hospital and Stanford Adult Hospital, both of which pursued aggressive sustainability goals. In designing them, we expected to develop portfolios of sustainable medical equipment, but at that time no company understood what that meant.  Now we are making it happen. 
Medical equipment is a significant energy consumer in the medical center. In addition to consumption, medical equipment creates significant material flows from consumables and has end of life issues. 
No health facility selects an MRI based on its energy consumption; clearly, clinical effectiveness is the preeminent concern. But at one time, we said the same thing about ventilation and architecture, and today, we are striving to create zero energy buildings that are better at supporting patients and caregivers. 
This session identifies opportunities for health facility designers to move the needle on this seemingly intractable problem.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Apply the principles of the AAMI standards for sustainable medical equipment
2. Analyze medical equipment based upon energy consumption
3. Participate in the movement to create a database of medical equipment energy consumption
4. Resolve to use technology to achieve more sustainable facilities.

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

B03: 0 to DD in 3 days using 3P Kaizen - Integrated Delivery of the Cath Suite

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
David Mikos, AIA, NCARB, ACHA, LCI
Chairman & CEO, Anderson Mikos Architect Ltd.
 
Scott Nelson
VP of Construction, Advocate Healthcare
Josh Odelson
Sr. Project Manager, Power Construction Company

How do you cut your schematic design time in half while simultaneously optimizing all major operational workflows in a Cath Suite to maximize the patient experience? 3P Kaizen – that's how! This presentation will walk you through the 3P Kaizen design process that allowed a high-performance, integrated team along with a very engaged group of end users to develop a new Cath Suite space that helped increase patient satisfaction scores from 45% to 95%. This will include discussions of all preparation steps necessary to prepare and execute a 3P Kaizen event, the structure of the event itself, and the measureable outcomes this design process achieved.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to design, prepare, and execute a 3P Kaizen Event.
2. Learn how this process engages users to rethink the way they have been operating for years!
3. Recognize critical success factors to enable a successful 3P event.
4. Hear the measureable impacts this design process had after one year of operational use.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

B04: Micro Hospitals – Bringing innovative inpatient care to inner ring suburbs

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Kevin Ortner PMP, EDAC, PROCI
Director, Transformation Operations and Transition, The MetroHealth System
Kim Svoboda, RN, MBA
Director Business Development Integration, The MetroHealth System
Steve Whitcraft
Director of Healthcare, Turner
Kevin Wise
, The MetroHealth System

MetroHealth is an integrated, county governed, essential health system with an acute care hospital housing a Level I Adult Trauma and Burn Center, a skilled nursing facility and more than 25 locations throughout Cuyahoga County. MetroHealth handles more than one million patient visits including more than 100,000 in the Emergency Department annually. MetroHealth identified a need to provide inpatient services in Cleveland Ohio's inner ring surburbs and opened 2 new hospitals in January, 2018. These micro hospitals, as some people call them, were designed and constructed within existing facilities in less than 12 months. The presenters will share the streamlined approach that was used to design and construct these new hospitals, explain the DRG list development effort, modification of work flows, staffing models and equipment at each location, and share how these sites are now used as pilot sites for new technologies that will be used in the new hospital.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Describe the streamlined design and construction approach that enabled us to transform 2 existing medical centers into Micro Hospitals in 12 months.
2. Explain how we identified and addressed the level of service at each location including DRG identification, clinical coverage and cultural challenges.
3. Share how these two new hospitals are now serving as pilot sites for new technologies and work flows as we design and build our new bed tower.
4. Discuss the FFE assessment and procurement process and how we leveraged existing assets and support services while introducing many new technologies.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

B05: Transcending the Barriers to Generating the Optimal Patient Room

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Laura Adams, MSN, RN
Senior Nursing Director, University of Utah Health Sciences Hospital
 
Nathan Murray, AIA, NCARB
Design Principal, Vice President, TSA Architects

As one of the largest healthcare providers in the Intermountain West, The University of Utah engaged several practitioners and studies to develop a prototype for “The Patient Room of the Future” The impetus for this was to establish a forward-looking and enabling benchmark for design that would be carried through the complete remodel of the existing six level hospital tower as well as in new planned expansions to the hospital. Top healthcare organizations have a vision for transforming healthcare in the patient room to meet their overall mission, yet frequently, the myriad of potentially opposing processes, constraints, and other cultural and physical barriers get in the way of really achieving it. We break down the process by which nationally-ranked University of Utah Medical Center created the roadmap to remove barriers in achieving their vision to create a prototypical patient room for the future . . . to be implemented and expanded upon across their system.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Participants will describe the Imperatives to Achieving Optimal Room Design.
2. Participants will gain insight into how Healthcare Mega Trends Affect the Patient Room.
3. Participants will describe how to Overcome Paradoxes in Achieving Patient Room Goals.
4. Participants will be exposed to Different Solutions Recently Implemented toward Achieving Optimal Patient Room Design.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

B06: Late Breaking Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

This session will be announced in June 2018. Please check back later for full description and speakers.
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

B07: Surrounded by Loved Ones – Design for Families in End of Life Care

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Ruth Thomson, DO, MBA, HMDC, FACOI, FAAHPM
Medical Director, Jack Byrne Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Charlie Rizza, AIA
Associate Partner, E4H Environments for Health Architecture

The end of life can be a challenge for patients, families and the staff who care for them. A holistic approach to hospice design must balance the emotive needs of this human experience for all. The Jack Byrne Center for Palliative & Hospice Care at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center incorporates special amenities designed to increase support for patients, families and staff, whether it be physical, emotional or spiritual comfort. Outlets for creativity encourage the use of art and music. Youth areas offer distraction and play for kids. Massage and spa spaces emphasize the importance of physical touch and connection with others. Meditation and reflection help individuals to navigate emotionally charged transitions. A family kitchen and dining room allows for the comfort of preparing and sharing a meal with loved ones, a cornerstone for many families. This session will illustrate best practices and design elements crucial to supporting patients and caregivers in the end of life process.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Summarize the research supported best practices for end of life care
2. Review amenities that support family involvement in end of life care
3. Understand the education initiatives of Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Section of Palliative Care
4. Observe how DHMC integrated these best practices in their new facility

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

B08: Enterprise Care Model: Making a Multi-Campus Master Plan for Scripps Health

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Mark Erath
Principal, SmithGroupJJR
Chai Jayachandran
Healthcare Studio Leader, SmithGroupJJR
Issam Khalaf
Vice President Western Region Manager Program and Construction Management, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc.
Bruce A. Rainey, MHA
Vice President Construction and Facilities, Scripps Health

Amid a transformational healthcare landscape, rising competition, and fast-approaching 2030 seismic mandate for California hospitals, Scripps Health embarked on a 2.8-million sf, multi-campus masterplan. Scripps engaged SmithGroupJJR to be the Executive Architect for the transformation of the hospital facilities over the next 50 year horizon, and the team devised an approach that expedited decisions to allocate specialties and rationalize funds across the continuum of care, as well as scheduled entitlements and permitting processes. The strategic team overlaid financial data on staff counts and translated customer strategy, operations planning, and design priorities into standardized space requirements. Ultimately, the campus-specific programs and plans became the Basis of Design for architectural solicitations. In implementation, the team continues to utilize comprehensive project controls to manage issues of time, cost, scope, and quality across multiple simultaneous projects.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand methods to support healthcare system goals through prioritization of capital funds across campuses and the continuum of care
2. Examine how innovative techniques in strategic planning can be used to align client priorities
3. Gain insights into the application of multi-campus programming and operational planning
4. Learn critical construction management techniques to enable the phased implementation of a multi-campus master plan while maintaining operations

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

B09: Moving Beyond Bedrest; Rethinking Hospital Environments for Older Patients

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Barbara Miszkiel
Director, Health, HDR Architecture Associates Inc.
Paula Rochon, MD, MPH, FRCPC
Sr. Scientist, Women's College Research Institute (WCRI), VP, Research, Women's College Hospital

What is happening to our older patients while in hospital? They use the greatest number of drug therapies to manage physical and behavioral challenges, victims of a prescribing cascade. And they are often getting too much bedrest. The associated inactivity of a hospital stay can counteract the goal of healing and wellness. We know the greatest use of healthcare services occurs in our later years. We have known for decades the positive impact design can have for older patients. But little has been done to rethink our model of acute care for the elderly. Discover how a geriatrician and an architect can work together to explore the boundaries of established thinking and inspire a new approach to design of the healthcare environment for older patients. We will explore how collaborative new approaches between clinical and design can improve drug safety, patient care and quality of life.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Discover why rethinking clinical practice and design for older patients in hospital is so vital.
2. Learn how clinical and design collaboration can challenge the bed-centric model.
3. Explore how small-scale interventions can be as effective as re-builds.
4. Understand the impact of cultural and regional perspectives in applying the results of current research and best practice.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

B10: Small Hospital Recapitalization – Developing an Optimized Future State

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Aaron Hanley
Architect, APA
Glenn Marsh, FHFI, EDAC
Director of Project Planning & Support Division, U.S. Army Health Facility Planning Agency (HFPA/G9)
Eric Poulsen
Principal, Medical Planner, The Innova Group

Small and rural hospitals across the U.S. face mounting challenges with aging infrastructure, changing reimbursement models, decreasing inpatient volume, and difficulties hiring and retaining staff. In 2016, the DoD published recommendations for the restructure or realignment of services at several military medical facilities. The descoping of inpatient and surgical services at one facility created opportunities to recapitalize the space for improved space utilization, staff efficiency, and patient experience. The success of a long-range master planning effort depends on key stakeholders being fully vested in the outcome. It is essential to get all planning assumptions and considerations “on the table” and aligned with the mission, vision, and values of the organization. The planning team must quickly discover and prioritize the most significant operational and facility-related challenges which need to be addressed in developing an optimized future solution.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Recognize that fragmented and dysfunctional space can drive the need for more staff to deliver the same care (~60% of facility costs are staffing).
2. Understand the importance of service delivery planning (strategic and market analysis) in developing an optimized future vision for the facility.
3. Prioritize the needs of multiple stakeholder groups and establish criteria with techniques for evaluating alternative facility solutions.
4. Discover how improved alignment, integration, and adjacency of key services can yield significant staffing, space, and operational efficiencies.

Track C
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

C01: The Secret to Ambulatory Transformation - Breaking down conventional Silos

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Aaron Lewis
SVP Strategic Growth, RCCH HealthCare Partners
Richard Prevallet, CHFM, MBA
VP Facilities & Construction, Tucson Medical Center HealthCare
Andrew Ubben
Chief Strategy Officer, Co-Founder, Real Estate Strategies

Real Estate Strategies (“RES”) will moderate an immersive panel discussion with Executive Leaders of two healthcare providers, RCCH HealthCare Partners, a 16-system organization in 12 states, and Tucson Medical Center HealthCare (“TMC”) located in Southern Arizona. While each face unique Strategic Planning and Implementation challenges in very different market environments, they are both similarly tasked with expanding ambulatory care while meeting system-wide financial, mission, and executive level objectives. These Executive Leaders will share their recent experiences, lessons learned and efforts to expand the impact of their ambulatory delivery networks and better serve their communities needs in a convenient, highly accessible manner. Presenters will share how to avoid failure or delays in strategic planning approval by insuring the plans are presented to key stakeholders in a logical, compelling manner that is both easy to understand and poised for rapid implementation.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Recognize  Challenges and Solutions involved in the process of creating, approving, and implementing an Ambulatory Strategy for diverse market types.
2. Gain exposure to the latest tools, data and resources available to identify  and quickly capitalize on market opportunities .
3. Learn from examples of systems who have enhanced their delivery model by implementing effective Ambulatory Growth Plans.
4. Obtain the knowledge and confidence necessary to begin an ambulatory expansion journey in order to gain a competitive edge for your system

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

C02: Delivering Quality Care – What We Can Learn from The Corporate Workplace

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
David Euscher, ASID, IIDA, LEEDAP
Vice President, Interiors Lead, Corgan
Tina Larsen, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC
Managing Principal, Healthcare Sector Lead, Corgan
Debbie Lynch, RN
Director of ASC Services, SpineTeam Texas

Staff attitude a big complaint in negative reviews of healthcare organizations. Corporate America sees the impact the work environment has on employee satisfaction, productivity, recruitment and retention. Can healthcare organizations learn from the corporate workplace to better support their staff and improve patient satisfaction?

In a recent survey, 69% of healthcare respondents reported job stress, the highest of any industry. Inadequate nursing staff levels caused by excessive turnover are associated with nursing errors, thus lowering quality of care ratings. High costs are associated with work-related stress in terms of absenteeism, decreased productivity, employee turnover and burn-out. The industry is reaching critical shortages in nursing and one analysis indicates the shortage will reach a national deficit of nearly 920,000 by the year 2030. When recruiting and retaining talent, healthcare organizations can take cues from Corporate America’s strategies and lessons learned.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the most common factors in work-related stress, staff dissatisfaction and burn-out and the impact on care quality and patient satisfaction
2. Learn what work-related factors are most important to millennial workers in the healthcare setting
3. Explore innovative approaches and lessons learned from corporate workplace strategies and how they can be applied in healthcare settings
4. Discuss examples of strategies and amenities healthcare organizations can implement to improve staff satisfaction and reduce burn-out

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

C03: Late Breaking Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

This session will be announced in June 2018. Please check back later for full description and speakers.
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

C04: Transforming Care Using Telehealth

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Patrick M. Casey
Executive Director - Office of Planning, Design, and Construction, University of Mississippi Medical Center
 
Thomas Hale, MD, PhD
VP for Product Innovation, NAVVIS
 
David Hirschbuehler, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Principal, Forum Studio

Hear from two healthcare institutions in what drove them to develop their telemedicine programs and where they are today. What were the challenges and barriers to gain buy in from the leadership of each institution and how were these challenges and barriers overcome. Where are their programs today and are they experiencing growth and what does this growth look like? Who are these new partners and what do they bring to support a successful telemedicine program? What does the future hold fro telemedicine and what limitations will have to be overcome? Look inside the buildings and what the external recipient environment requirements are. What is the data telling us as we move deeper into telemedicine? Are there any downsides to telemedicine?

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explore the challenges in setting up a telehealth program
2. Discover outcomes that are demonstrating the success of telehealth
3. Learn about the technology and infrastructure requiremens to support a telehealth program
4. Understand who these new partners are and the roles they play in developing a broader telehealth network

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

C05: 3 HealthPlex Facilities, 3 Communities, 1 Opening Date

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Peter Barlow, AIA,NCARB, LEED AP
Director of Architecture, Miller Architects
Ryan Goss, LEED AP BD+C
Project Manager, Turner
Greg Strahan, MBA, MHA
President & Chief Executive Officer, Owensboro Health System
J. Lee Williams, MBA, CM-BIM, LEED AP
Senior Project Manager, CBRE

Owensboro Health recently embarked on a $67.5 million Healthplex program to re-imagine their ambulatory network strategy. The program consists of three 42,000 square foot outpatient centers in three separate markets throughout western Kentucky; all designed, constructed and opened simultaneously. The buildings were designed based on a modular concept that could be easily adapted by new providers and services lines. Standardizing the facilities around common concepts, Owensboro Health was able to accelerate speed-to-market and consolidate disparate operations while realizing economies of scale. Under the Healthplex model, $5 million worth of cost savings were recognized by using Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), standardizing construction documents, realizing group buying opportunities, and optimizing resources from one building to the next.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how standardizing design and construction can increase speed-to-market, decrease cost, and provide operational flexibility.
2. Recognize savings through efficient scheduling and leveraging purchasing scale across multiple sites.
3. Discover the benefits of using integrated delivery models to sustain relationships with familiar partners and quickly onboard new team members.
4. Discuss how a consolidated clinic model can help realize operational efficiencies and increase brand awareness in surrounding service areas.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

C06: Engaging the Neonatal Intensive Care Team to Create a Supportive Environment

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Mary Kate Florian RN
Patient Service Manager, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Yale-New Haven Health System
Pam Lesser, RNC-AWH, MSN
Director Perinatal Services SSM Health, St. Mary's Hospital
Shanna Wiechel
Managing Principal, Operations, Christner Inc.

Hospitals’ shift from ward-style units to single-family rooms represents a tremendous improvement for neonatal care as it allows greater control of the patient environment, but it does create challenges for communication which require successful integration of technology. The latest trend, neonatal couplet care, facilitates care for both the post-partum mother and neonate in a single room. Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital and SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital will share inspiring case studies about how their clinical teams were engaged to optimize the physical environment for clinical workflow and patient, family and staff experience. Both utilized mock-ups to communicate ideas and solicit feedback, but each faced unique challenges – especially around incorporation of technology. The interactive session will provide lessons learned and guidance for healthcare leaders looking to implement design methodology and supporting technology.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

C07: The Convergence Movement in Healthcare

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Kimberlie Cerrone
CEO/Founder, Tiatros
 
Abigail Clary, AIA ACHA LEED AP
Principal, Cannon Design
 
Eric Johnson
National Director - Healthcare, Transwestern
 
Spencer Seals, MS - Hospital Administration
Director of Construction and Facilities Planning, Cook Children's Medical Center
MODERATOR
 
Lisa Feeley
Vice President of Healthcare Advisory Project Management & Construction Services, Transwestern

Healthcare is constantly changing due to its complexity.  Delivery of healthcare has many players and is expanding as fast as the people it serves. Come join us to hear from 5 experts in the industry and to learn about our white paper facilitated by IMEG and Transwestern who collaborated with over 28 contributors from 23 organizations to address the following topics:


* Disruption in the delivery of healthcare
* Generational Consumption
* The Hot Buttons 
* What facilities need to consider
* The Crystal Ball - Value based; Pay for Performance; Other?

All of us are involved in the delivery of healthcare in some capacity and the future demands more collaboration to deliver value while remaining focused on being fluid, efficient, and effective.  As a world leader, the U.S. must find a way to help our patients access healthcare more proactively in a cost effective manner so that through early access, we can save money - giving our organizations more capital to invest in further technologies & facilities to continue to improve health for all.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Incorporate findings from the white paper and diverse healthcare perspectives to gain new insights for your firm.
2. Establish new approach to your firm's services and products based on key takeaways from contributors' perspectives.
3. Gain understanding of healthcare consumption by baby boomers, generation X, and millennials.
4. Enhanced perception of AI, retail health, etc. and where your firm can fit in.

 

 

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

C08: Healthcare for the Homeless Houston: A Beacon for a vulnerable population

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Joan Albert
Principal, Page
 
Kurt Neubek, FAIA, LEED AP, EDAC
Principal / Architect, Page
TBD TBD
, Healthcare for the Homeless Houston

Providing healthcare services for homeless populations is an urban issue across the country. The Healthcare for the Homeless Houston, provides these much needed services, and had to find a new location. The location in midtown, near the Greyhound bus station, and close to other services made the 1950's Seafarer's building the perfect choice for the facility, if not the ideal building. At first glance it did not have enough square footage for their needs and was too close to existing restaurant front door. Significant construction work was necessary to make it fit their needs: Constructing a vibrant green entry/ pedestrian cover / way-finding element Capturing under building parking area for their administration suite Moving the entry and removing slab to create a three story space which provided a welcome lobby, three story wall for graphics and security view Opening exterior wall for natural light Extensive studies of exam rooms to be friendly but highly secure for physicians.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Examining the major architectural and structural moves made to transform a simple box to a beacon for dignity and healthcare for the homeless.
2. Show multiple patient room studies that promoted optimum safety for physicians, and also comfort and a calming environment for the patient population.
3. Distinguish the design and planning elements that could provide guidance for similar homeless and behavioral health clinics.
4. Identify design elements that specifically address unique issues, like expanded waiting for food dispense, additional charging stations, hygiene area.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

C09: Rural Healthcare Facilities as Innovation Incubators

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Amy Douma, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Vice President, HGA Architects and Engineers
Danielle Gearhart, FACHE
Chief Executive Officer, Gundersen St. Joseph's Hospital
Kiki Werkheiser, EDAC, CLSSGB
Work Process Specialist, HGA Architects and Engineers

While urban health systems are often credited with driving healthcare innovation, rural facilities can be fertile ground for new ideas. Staffing and funding shortages, changing community needs – the fundamental challenges of rural care – can engender creative solutions that push the boundaries of traditional thinking and leverage staff and space in new ways. What are some examples of recent innovations, and how can they enhance other facilities – at scales both large and small? How were these ideas generated, and how can similar processes encourage “out of the box” thinking? This session will use case studies to answer these questions. From universal platforms that “shape-shift” as needs change, to hospitals designed for outpatient conversion – these projects showcase unique strategies adopted by rural providers that could reshape care delivery. The session will also examine the processes used to uncover breakthrough ideas and encourage staff to embrace new delivery concepts.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explore emerging operational and planning strategies that challenge traditional patient care boundaries.
2. Identify potential roadblocks in creating interdepartmental care platforms and learn how to navigate them.
3. Review processes that engage leadership and front-line staff in innovating traditional care models and designing shared, flexible space.
4. Learn how to cultivate the cultural shifts that promote efficiency, adaptability and collaboration.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

C10: Relocation is Transformation - Don't Survive Your Move, Thrive In It

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Steven E. Carter, Ph.D.
President & CEO, Carter Inc.
 
Karen DeShon, Ph.D.
Partner, Organizational Development & Effectiveness Lead, Coetic, Inc.
 
Kirk McKie, RN
, Carter, Inc.
 
Scott Turner
Chief Operating Officer, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Executive Vice President, Children's Hospital and Health System
MODERATOR
 
Montie Garrison
Director, Transition Planning, Carter, Inc.

This session is about how to manage organizational change that must occur when a healthcare facility moves, expands, renovates or re-stacks. New healthcare facilities are accompanied by significant changes in the way day-to-day administration, building operations and especially patient care services are conducted and provided. Commonly, these changes cause angst among the care providers and support staff. A program of change management and communications must be implemented to address the social and emotional changes in addition to those within the environment of care. Exacerbating this problem is the common failure to integrate the activities of designing, building, and outfitting the new building (building readiness) with the activities surrounding operational and transition planning (operational readiness).

 

The problems of change management, communications, and project integration must be identified and solved to ensure successful healthcare real estate projects. Our session panel would like to share our experience in providing solutions within this arena.

 

We will present best practices regarding:

  • The philosophy behind the structuring of the project organization that will effectively integrate building and operational readiness planning and management
  • How to develop and execute a change management process that will assist providers and staff to navigate smoothly through the transition to a new environment and catalyze an improved culture of care
  • How to develop and implement a communications program that will effectively support change, assist in the integration of building and operational readiness, and provide a platform for giving voice to the organizational aspirations that compelled the move to new facilities

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. To understand the relocation, expansion or renovation of a hospital or healthcare facility can be a true opportunity to change the culture of care.
2. To understand the importance of integrating operational and building readiness and how to establish an organizational structure that will ensure this integration.
3. To understand the importance of a substantive change management and communications program to the success of a relocation or other significant building project.
4. To better perceive the connection between staff satisfaction and patient satisfaction in the context of a relocation.

Track D
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

DF1: Owners Only Roundtable – Session One – Before you hire a design team…

Separate Registration Required

SPEAKERS
David Vitka, R.A., M. Arch, M.B.A.
Vice President Facility Planning - Continuing Care Services, Catholic Health System
 
Donna Ware
Executive Director, Planning and Design, BJC HealthCare

The purpose of this two part roundtable is to create an environment for individuals employed by a hospital or health care system who oversee capital construction projects to gather and openly exchange ideas.  We will tackle topics encountered in the day to day operations of being an owner’s representative managing the architects, engineers and contractors working on our projects.  In the first session we will focus on subjects encountered prior to bringing a design team on board.  In the second session we will focus on subjects encountered once the design team is under contract.​

This session will only be open to those attendees employed by hospitals or health care systems. Information on how to sign up for this session will be sent to paid registrants who are employed by a hospital or health care system. If you have any questions please email jenabeth@jdevents.com

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

DF2: Owners Only Roundtable – Session Two – Now that the design team is on board…

Separate Registration Required

SPEAKERS
David Vitka, R.A., M. Arch, M.B.A.
Vice President Facility Planning - Continuing Care Services, Catholic Health System
 
Donna Ware
Executive Director, Planning and Design, BJC HealthCare

The purpose of this two part roundtable is to create an environment for individuals employed by a hospital or health care system who oversee capital construction projects to gather and openly exchange ideas.  We will tackle topics encountered in the day to day operations of being an owner’s representative managing the architects, engineers and contractors working on our projects.  In the first session we will focus on subjects encountered prior to bringing a design team on board.  In the second session we will focus on subjects encountered once the design team is under contract.

This session will only be open to those attendees employed by hospitals or health care systems. Information on how to sign up for this session will be sent to paid registrants who are employed by a hospital or health care system. If you have any questions please email jenabeth@jdevents.com

 

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

DF3: It's Not Business, It's Personal

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Philip LiBassi AIA, ACHA
Global Healthcare Leader, DLR Group|WRL

What happens when a healthcare architect becomes the parent of a cancer patient? Speaker Phil LiBassi’s interest in healthcare design began early in his career when his 5-year-old nephew was hospitalized and succumbed to a heart condition. While his nephew received competent care, the family’s experience with the environment–from the arrival at the parking garage, to the patient room in which they sat–was at best, marginal. Moved by this experience, Phil has focused his 30+ year career on improving the patient/family experience. In February 2011, Phil and his family encountered a similar journey with their son and brother, Sam–an experience that fortified Phil’s belief in patient-centered design. “It’s Not Business, It’s Personal” offers a unique perspective through the eyes of a parent who also happens to be a healthcare architect, exploring lessons learned from the other side, how our preconceived notions impact healthcare design, and the possibilities for creating a new institution.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explore what defines the patient experience and whether we are creating the new institution
2. Discuss the experience of being on the other side of design as a patient or family member
3. Define both qualitative and quantitative improvements that can be addressed through design
4. Challenge the audience to recognize and reconsider preconceived notions about how they approach the design and construction of healthcare facilities

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

DF4: DISCUSSION FORUM: Late Breaking Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

This session will be announced in June 2018. Please check back later for full description and speakers.
Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

D05: Combating heart disease with $80 million Heart Institute in just 15 months

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Amy Bush, BSN, MBA, RN, CNOR
Vice President of Operations, West Virginia Medicine
 
David Jaeger, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, EDAC
Principal & Healthcare Design Studio Director, Harley Ellis Devereaux (HED)

WVU Medicine is tackling one of the toughest challenges related to high rates of heart disease with a new $80 million Heart and Vascular Institute. The need is essential with heart disease the state’s No. 1 killer. WVU’s vision to become a leading academic institution delivering cutting edge cardiac services was developed with an aggressive campaign to recruit top specialists. WVU Health was constructing a 10-story tower, originally designed as a Children’s Hospital. Once the Heart program was deemed top priority, several floors of the building were redesigned while it was being constructed. The task was to complete design and construction in 15 months, in lieu of the traditional three years. The team met the aggressive schedule utilizing design-assist, design-build and an intense amount of creativity. The success of the cardiac program is evident: inpatient cardiovascular procedures are up 57%, clinic visits increased by 33% and vascular surgery is 12% higher than last year.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how the hospital created the vision, recruited the talent and is positioning WVU Health for success across the entire Southeast.
2. Transforming a building under construction into new Heart & Vascular Institute while maintaining schedule and budget.
3. How to achieve speed to market through creative methods including design-assist, design-build and intense collaboration.
4. Learn the value of utilizing lean design workshops to expeditiously complete design with concentrated user input.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

D06: Taking on the Silver Tsunami: Two Approaches – Longevity Performance & Adaptive Reuse

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
William K. Kapp III, M.D., M.S., FAAOS
Founder & President, Landmark Hospitals
Debra Lemons, AIA, IIDA
Director of Interior Design and Guest Experience Specialist, HuntonBrady Architects
 
Carol Lynn
Sr. Designer/Planner, Devenney Group Architects
 
Paul Macheske, AIA, ACHA, LEED AP
Associate Principal, Dir. of Healthcare Design, HuntonBrady Architects
Scott Rasmussen
Project Architect, Devenney Group Ltd. Architects

We are rapidly approaching a “silver” tsunami in the US and worldwide.  With the rapidly aging population, costs for senior housing and medical delivery are outpacing funds available.  This super session explores two approaches to combat this dilemma: The Longevity Performance Center offers aging robust and healthy as a new paradigm with biologic remodeling with clinical feedback to enhance lean muscle mass,  genetic plasticity,  biologic plasticity  and neural plasticity in aging adults.  BridgeWater Assisted Living – Deer Valley offers a contrasting approach with a case study in “flipping” a dilapidated hotel into an assisted living facility to achieve affordable care.  Both sessions consider consumerism in healthcare to meet the rising challenges that consumers, healthcare systems and design professionals will soon face.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1.  Learn what the silver tsunami is  and how it will override the current healthcare delivery system without intervention.
2.  Clinical understanding of how longevity and performance are interrelated and the technology to alter an individual’s quality of life for healthy aging
3.  Understand essential design decisions that are unique to the aging population in a wellness focused facility.
4.  Learn how consumerism in healthcare translates to an experiential approach vs. a programmatic approach.
5.  Understand the challenges with adaptive reuse in working within the confines of an existing structure and converting an R-4 to an I-1 occupancy.
6.  Learn how to translate different aspects of design into senior friendly environments that provide affordable care for seniors and veterans.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

D07: Coal to Gas Conversion with Added Reliability as Bi-Furcated Central Plant

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
John A. Balzer
Vice President, Facility Planning and Development, Froedtert Health
 
Jay Ehrfurth
Director - Power / Industrial, The Boldt Company
 
Mark Geronime
Vice President of Operations, Milwaukee Regional Medical Center (MRMC)

Faced with high steam/chilled water utility rates, a required coal to gas fuel conversion and aging thermal assets MRMC had several paramount decisions to undertake. Should a health care provider branch outside their core competencies and own/operate their own thermal plant? This presentation addresses the steps of developing a proforma case justifying the economics, forming a thermal entity, purchasing the plant from the local utility, putting together the right team of designers/constructors to deliver the project and selecting a third-party operator/maintenance managing group. Buried within all these activities were the axioms of the project; Redundancy - a second or bi-furcated plant to provide continuous supply of critical thermal services with geographic source diversity; Reliability - investment in plant and distribution infrastructure to enhance uninterrupted, consistent source of thermal services; and Environmental - reduce noxious emissions through elimination of coal.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Build physical redundancy by bi-furcating plant steam and chilled water production assets
2. Utilize cleaner combustion technology to develop improved environmental emissions
3. Evaluate improved economics for steam and chilled water production.
4. Assess LEAN construction principles for delivery of a thermal plant project.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

D08: Making a Difference: Renovating a Peds Inpatient Behavioral Health Unit

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Reginald Bannerman, MSN, MBA, RN, NE-BC
Director of Nursing, Psychiatry, Children's National Medical Center
Madeline Hill, LEED GA
Interior Designer, Array Architects
Laura Morris, CHID, IIDA, LEED AP BD+C, Lean Green Belt
Principal & Interior Design Director, Array Architects
Jon Sell AIA
Principal and Healthcare Planner, Array Architects

In fall 2015, Children’s National Medical Center embarked on a project to renovate and reimagine their sub-divided child and adolescent behavioral health inpatient unit. This unit was land-locked by other programs, divided in two by a public corridor and was struggling to find space for all the patients needing care. CNMC hired Array to help fulfill a vision by the leadership on how they provide care for patient mix, while bringing their dated unit up to code and current best practice in behavioral health. Learn how, through a lean methodology and phased project approach, the team allowed for flexibility and growth, shared support and a state of the art design. Learn how footprint challenges were overcome using technology and security innovations while still allowing for a dynamic and inspiring space for patients to heal - addressing both the child and adolescent populations. Post occupancy outcomes and lessons learned will be shared from both a design and clinical perspective.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how the planning allowed for flexibility and growth as well as shared services from both the child and adolescent behavioral health units.
2. Understand how leadership's vision at Children's National Medical Center was implemented to create a state-of-the-art design that meets client needs.
3. Learn how the patient mix at Children's National Medical Center created challenges and opportunities that were unique to this overall project.
4. Understand how the Unit is performing and outcomes of post occupancy study.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

D09: Resurgence of a 1980's Acute Care Hospital in the Age of the ACA

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
David Boome AIA
System Director - Design & Construction, Norton Healthcare
Jon Cooper
Chief Administrative Officer, Norton Audubon Hospital
Jason Hartz, AIA
Principal, LMH Architecture
George McMinn
Senior Project Executive, Messer Construction Company

This case study will explore the expansion and major renovation of Norton Audubon Hospital in Louisville Kentucky. The multi-year master facility plan for the hospital focused on enhanced patient privacy, patient satisfaction, efficiency and clinical value. The hospital remained open and completely functional during this process and continued to meet the needs of the patients served. Components of the project include:  
1. A two-story patient bed tower addition to house 74 private patient beds.
2. Remodel of existing patient rooms.
3. Major upgrades and expansion of the Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and Open Heart Unit.
4. Addition of three open heart operating rooms, renovation of the existing surgery department and an expanded recovery area.
5. New main entry with improved patient registration and amenities such as a café, gift shop and interactive music therapy experience.
6. Expanded cath lab prep and recovery area.
7. A general upgrade of the existing infrastructure.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Outline the multi-year master facility plan for the hospital focused on enhanced patient privacy, patient satisfaction, efficiency and clinical value.
2. Review the design strategies implemented to facilitate and meet the goals outlined in the master facility plan.
3. Review the challenges of renovating hospital departments within existing space while maintaining full facility operation.
4. Learn about the lean driven construction approach for dealing with outdated facility infrastructure.

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

D10: New Undersea Hyperbaric Medicine Clinic at BAMC – A Case Study

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Naresh Mathur, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP
President, NMA Architects Planners
Christopher Sharp, PMP
Account Manager, Joint Base San Antonio, Fort Worth District, US Army Corps of Engineers

A growth in Hyperbaric treatment facilities is anticipated with Medicare coverage for Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy. US has an inadequate number of HBO treatment facilities for high-acuity patients according to a survey conducted by Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society. Military has been a leader in Hyperbaric Medicine and research with a long history in San Antonio. A Hyperbaric Chamber was constructed at Brooks Air Force Base that was moved to Wilford Hall. Undersea Hyperbaric Medicine Addition to Brooke Army Medical Center completed in 2017 consolidates Hyperbaric medicine at Joint Base San Antonio. The facility provides inpatient and outpatient treatment for military and civilian patients for wounds therapy. Other hyperbaric treatments include air or gas embolism, carbon monoxide poisoning, decompression sickness, crush Injuries, anemia and acute thermal burns. US Air Force 2017 Design Awards Program recognized the project with a Merit award for achievement of design excellence.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Architectural Considerations including fire protection requirements for Hyperbaric Medicine Facility design and construction.
2. Interior Design Considerations for Hyperbaric Medicine Facility design and construction.
3. Construction challenges for Hyperbaric Medicine Addition at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio
4. Design and utility requirements for Architecturally Significant Equipment including Mono-place and Multi-place hyperbaric chambers.

Track E
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

E01: Re-Thinking the ED: Optimizing the ED Efficiency and Patient Flow

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Benjamin Easter, MD, MBA
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine
Negin Houshiarian, MArch, PhD
Healthcare Designer and Researcher, HkS Inc.
 
Debajyoti Pati, PHD, FIIA, LEED AP
Professor, Texas Tech University

As ED crowding has worsened and its effects catalogued, ED leaders have sought process improvements around efficiency while architects have proposed design strategies to achieve the same. Unfortunately, these efforts have largely failed to cross professional boundaries. In this session, we will share the results of research about the interaction between ED design and flow with a goal to optimize split-flow patient care systems. This empirical study is a 2 factor analysis, examining the interaction of 3 flow models with 3 design types to compare operational metrics and patient-centered metrics. We used 21 months of patient data at The University of Colorado ED to create and validate 9 simulation models and extrapolated their performance. Flow split by ESI with 1 waiting area (the most common model used by EDs) was used as the control. Our results will show which model improved operational and patient centered metrics.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Evaluate models of care, the interaction of flows and physical design typologies, on ED flow metrics, including length of stay and room turnover.
2. Compare ED models on patient-centered metrics, including door to provider time, left without being seen rate, and number of movements per patient.
3. Assess the best options for an ED with either fixed flow or fixed design, and demonstrate how changes in the other variables improve outcomes.
4. Introduce a multi-disciplinary (medical science, healthcare design, and process engineering) research method to offer a solution for ED efficiency.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

E02: Network Transformation & the Engaged Consumer Experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Andrea Harnden
Manager, System Marketing Integration, Northwestern Medicine
Christopher Howe
SVP, Retail Experience Design, Adrenaline
 
Sean Keathley
President, Adrenaline
Lynn Murphy
Director, Planning and Construction, Northwestern Medicine

Emerging technologies, channels and automation are shifting the way we interact with each other, our culture and ultimately consumer expectations. Consumers have a vast amount of choices at their fingertips and today’s brands understand experience is the great differentiator. Automated patient engagement is becoming one of the most significant drivers in the transformation of healthcare. At Northwestern Medicine, a growing, nationally recognized health system that provides world-class care throughout Chicago, an improved patient experience is a priority, as well as an increased brand presence and consistency – across all patient touchpoints, including the physical space.  Join our team to learn their insights on emerging experiential trends, changing patient expectations and the processes & methodology they used to translate the Northwestern brand, transform their convenient care locations and create a more consumer-driven experience.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Recognize the key drivers of change and identify how to build loyalty and efficient communication with patients where engagement is now expected
2. Understand how emerging experiential concepts help create front-end branding alignment across a physical network in diverse geographies
3. Learn how forming collaborative teams across organizational silos bring a consistent message with measured cost effectiveness
4. Understand how to translate and maximize exterior site branding for an optimal visual experience and presence

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

E03: The 2018 Guidelines: What You Need to Know

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Douglas Erickson, FASHE, CHFM, HFDP, CHC
CEO, Facility Guidelines Institute

FGI's Guidelines for Design and Construction documents are the design standards most often employed by medical planners, designers, and owners of hospitals; outpatient facilities; and residential health, care, and support facilities. AHJs in 38 states enforce some edition of the Guidelines—with many states adopting the new edition upon its release. However, even states that haven’t officially adopted the Guidelines often refer to its requirements to help determine their own minimum standards. This session will highlight the key factors that influenced changes to the 2018 Guidelines, including the decision to separate hospital and outpatient facility requirements to better address the unique needs of these facilities, minimize costs, and encourage flexibility of use. The presenter will address new sections of text and provide an overview of changes to requirements for recovery spaces; imaging, examination, procedure, and operating rooms; and satellite sterile processing spaces.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Explain how changes in the 2018 Guidelines will impact the design of clinical spaces in health and residential care facilities.
2. Apply the new classification system for imaging rooms and examination, procedure, and operating room.
3. Explain the impetus and methodology for revisions to the 2018 Guidelines, including creation of the new outpatient document.
4. Represent how using the updated Guidelines for a project can provide a safer and more effective patient care environment at a reasonable cost.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

E04: Avoid Tunnel Vision: Using the Big Room to See the Big Picture

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Andrew Beaufeaux
Project Manager, Cannon & Wendt Electric Co.
Jared Mason
Senior Associate, WSP
Don Petty, LEED AP
Executive Vice President, W.D. Manor
Charlie Thompson
Senior Project Manager, DPR Construction
Aaron Zeligman
Senior Project Manager, Banner Health

The story of the Banner University Medical Center Phoenix is a shining example of how the Big Room’s culture of flexibility and teamwork can solve some of the most complex challenges. When building the new emergency department and 13-story patient tower, Banner was faced with an entire campus refeed and numerous complicated existing conditions, all while keeping the 1.9-million-sq.-ft. academic medical center campus operating.   This presentation showcases how a multi-party team of diverse perspectives can challenge one another to develop creative and cost-effective solutions for the benefit of the facility's future. The panel will show you how this Big Room avoided tunnel vision to deliver creative, successful results while ensuring uninterrupted patient care. 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how to create a culture that encourages the team to think of better solutions with the support to ensure good ideas can be executed.
2. Demonstrate turning “the worst possible project location” into an “opportunity for success” through intentional team framework.
3. Learn pitfalls to Big Room problem solving and examples of how to address them.
4. Demonstrate lessons learned for design and construction major campus impacts.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

E05: 3 Tips on How-to Navigate an academic-private-sector merger

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Jeff Monzu
Vice President, LEO A DALY
Josh Olson
National Manager of Planning, Design, & Construction, Catholic Health Initiatives
Jason Studt, AHA CHC, LEED® AP
Senior Project Manager, JE Dunn

The CHI Health Bergan Mercy Medical Center and Creighton University School of Medicine and Hospital consolidation is one of Nebraska’s largest healthcare mergers to date. Completed in May of 2017, the $139 million project consisted of 280,000 SF of renovation to a 1,000,000+ SF hospital. Critical departments such as the ER, ICU, and NICU were moved, renovated, or worked-around; 11 bus-sized air handling units added or replaced; and a 140,000 SF building addition. The project merged the operation and culture of a teaching school and private hospital, and was completed without significant impact to patient population or experience. A CHI Health national manager, LEO A DALY vice president, and JE Dunn senior project manager will share challenges, achievements, and wisdom to help conference attendees succeed in their own consolidation projects. The presenters will share findings from a study of similar facilities, observations from related site tours, and a review of project outcomes.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Utilize 3 tips on how-to successfully consolidate an academic/private health system.
2. Sourced from multiple projects, identify the traits of successful mergers, and the common failures.
3. Integrate phasing strategies, construction techniques to minimize impact to patient care areas, and ways to merge operations and culture.
4. Resolve how design concepts are holding up a year after project completion.

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

E06: Renovating Operating Rooms with Surgical Precision

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Andrew Brumbach, AIA, EDAC
Senior Associate, Architecture, SmithGroupJJR
 
Tim Gregg, AIA, ACHA
Principal, SmithGroupJJR
 
Melanie Hall, AIA
Project Manager, Associate, SmithGroupJJR
Chet Schroeder, RA
Program Manager, Project Delivery Services, Beaumont Health
Many healthcare organizations fear that renovating the surgical suite will result in an expensive, disruptive, band-aid solution that does not fully address the needs of their patients or staff. This presentation illustrates successful renovation strategies applied at three varied healthcare institutions: 
a community hospital with an aging, challenging infrastructure
a high-volume, growing community hospital
a large, complex, tertiary and academic medical center
Each case study will detail the unique challenges and identify approaches that resulted in improvements to patient care and operations. 
The session will conclude with a comparison of key metrics (e.g., overall space/OR, renovation cost/OR, etc.) between the facilities and in relation to new construction.  We will also provide insight into the decision-making factors that influence the design and implementation of a surgical suite renovation.
 
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
1. Summarize reasons OR renovations are considered including capacity, technology, and infrastructure issues and the need to accommodate new procedures.
2. Distinguish varying facility conditions that influence which approaches to use in renovating surgical suites while maintaining operations.
3. Evaluate phasing plans and products to ensure patient and staff safety during on-going operations.
4. Compare surgical suite designs presented in terms of patient processes, technology, infrastructure, and cost and in comparison, to new construction.
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

E07: Creating A Collaborative Model of Healthcare Facility Design For the Future

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Xiaobo Quan, PhD, EDAC
Professor of Practice, Director, Center for Health Research & Design, Washington University in St. Louis
 
Donna Ware
Executive Director, Planning and Design, BJC HealthCare

Healthcare facilities constitute an important asset in improving the quality of care, strengthening population health, and reducing cost. However, healthcare organizations often struggle with the lack of expertise and other resources to innovatively optimize the facility design and evaluate design decisions in a rigorous and unbiased way. BJC HealthCare is partnering with Washington University in St. Louis in creating a multidisciplinary research center to better utilize the research expertise at a tier-one research university. The new collaborative model brings new insights from various disciplines to design optimization and evaluation, and facilitates the engagement of academic researchers on three projects that focus on hospital inpatient room, ambulatory surgery environment, and workplace design for healthcare business occupancies. Attendees will hear about the process and experience as well as the strengths of the new model and lessons learned.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn about a new model of collaboration between healthcare organization and university on healthcare facility design optimization and evaluation
2. Learn about a new model of collaboration between healthcare organization and university on healthcare facility design optimization and evaluation
3. Evaluate the benefits and room for improvement of the new model
4. Identify the opportunities of applying the lessons learned in research and design practices

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

E08: Room with a View: How Staff Engagement Led to a Shared Vision of the Future

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Helene Burns, MSN, RN, NEA-BC
Chief Nurse Executive and Vice President of Clinical Services, Jefferson Health New Jersey
Lisa Dutterer
Chief Administrative Officer, Jefferson Cherry Hill Hospital
Mark Palmer, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, CLGB
Senior Associate Vice President, CallisonRTKL

Despite strong leadership and quality staff, the aging infrastructure of Jefferson Health’s New Jersey hospitals needed modernization. Double-occupancy rooms and a lack of facility standardization created inconsistent levels of care and operational inefficiencies. Jefferson/CRTKL identified the design of the patient room as a critical element to the challenges and promote a new shared standard of care. The approach focused on continuous user input and engaged staff at interactive planning sessions, facility tours and virtual reality. At a week-long user engagement event, 150 staff members toured a physical and virtual reality mock-up of the patient room. Staff evaluated their practices and how the design of the room will enable better outcomes. A survey was conducted to collect quantifiable data as well as qualitative impressions. By committing to continuous user engagement, Jefferson is using design to improve care practices and foster a shared vision throughout the organization.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Experience how physical and virtual mock-ups provide long term value by enabling changes during design to eliminate changes during construction
2. Identify how using both a physical mock-up and the virtual reality mock-up give the client an experiential and holistic understanding of the design
3. Explain how data was collected and survey results were presented to the client and incorporated into the design
4. Describe how the culture shifted from “this is how we always do it” to a modern, optimal workflow focused on patient, family and staff experience
 

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

E09: The IPMO Model: Multi-firm collaboration for healthcare projects

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Kris Gaw, MBA
EVP, Chief Operating Officer, Maricopa Integrated Health System
Juliet Rogers, PhD, MPH
Chief Executive Officer, Blue Cottage Consulting
Bruce Russo
MIHS IPMO Project Director, Vanir Construction Management, Inc.

Hiring and coordinating multiple firms across several simultaneous projects in a multi-year capital project portfolio is a challenge, but when it involves multiple hospitals, ambulatory and specialty centers to be planned, designed, and constructed, coordination becomes the single most important factor in successful delivery. By the end of the Care Reimagined project, Maricopa Integrated Health System (MIHS) in Phoenix, AZ will be comprised of three behavioral health sites, one acute care hospital, several emergency and urgent care locations, three multispecialty ambulatory centers, and several community primary care clinics. The executive team chose an Integrated Project Management Office (IPMO) model to ensure coordination, collaboration, seamless hand-offs, and continuity across projects that would foster standardization and efficiency. Now one and a half years into a six year relationship, members of the IPMO team and hospital leadership will share the experience so far and lessons learned.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Summarize the IPMO structure for project delivery including team assembly, contracting, and delivery
2. Evaluate the benefits and challenge of the IPMO delivery structure for major, multi-year capital projects
3. Specify criteria for selecting the right members for the team and keeping them engaged throughout the entire project cycle
4. Summarize the conditions for success for both the owner and the IPMO team members

9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

E10: Big Things Come in Little Packages at Boston Children’s

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
SueEllen Donahoe, LEED AP
Manager, Facilities Planning & Design, Boston Children's Hospital
David Meek, Assoc AIA, LEED AP
Associate, Shepley Bulfinch

Perched atop the uppermost floors of the second oldest structure remaining at Boston Children’s Hospital, the clinical lab program supporting this renowned institution will be consolidated to 27,000 square feet of Sub Basement Level 2 in the new $1.2B Hale Building. While its modest 10% spatial increase doesn’t keep pace with the rest of the facility’s growth, the unique layout makes up for it. Wrapped by specialties, the central open lab design will be adept to handle changes in equipment, process and protocols for many years to come. With provisions for future automation put in place, and ample infrastructure, this smart, flexible layout was an uphill battle to maintain from concept to contract documents. Challenges in the planning phase addressed environmental change, functional colocation of previously separate labs, building geometry, logistics, and all the other physical demands that this comprehensive tower design could possibly present on a tight urban site.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Resolve to maintain your original concept regardless of obstacles and challenges
2. Address future needs for sequential conversion from manual benches to automated processing
3. Recognize and accommodate the different requirements of various analyzing spaces
4. Maximize the potential opportunity of an unconventional and restrictive floorplate

Track F
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

F01: The Leading Edge in Design for Interventional Imaging at MGH

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Susan Blomquist
Senior Associate, Payette
Ahin Handa
Senior Architect/Planner, Massachusetts General Hospital
Robert Sheridan, FAVIR
Director, Interventional Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital

A rapid increase in procedures that can be performed within minimally invasive environments through the use of interventional imaging equipment is prompting room upgrades and procedure room conversations across major academic medical centers. The balance between a highly functional space that can also provide a patient centered experience creates new opportunities for design innovation. 

The Department of Interventional Radiology at MGH has recently completed several new Interventional Radiology (IR) rooms, including renovation of the Recovery Intermediate Care Unit (RICA), using modular design while keeping the department fully operational.  

The new IR Rooms were a result of a highly collaborative design process between the MGH IR Department, MGH Planning and Construction, and Payette (architect). This collaborative approach resulted in rooms that are a seamless expression of design and equipment and reflect leading edge thinking on the future Interventional Imaging.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Demonstrate Basic Principles for Interventional Imaging
2. Learn Fundamentals of Equipment Coordination
3. Design Innovation in Procedural Environments
4. Technology Integration in Clinical Environments

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

F02: A paradigm for complying with revisions to USP <797> and <800>

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Tonia Burnette, RA
Senior Director, Johns Hopkins Health System, Architecture and Planning
Kevin Bernhard
Planner, Johns Hopkins Health System, Architecture and Planning

When first reading the regulations for USP <800> and <797> Design Professionals and Facilities Staff can quickly become overwhelmed by the complexity, and lack of familiar terms. The regulations were written by industry experts in Pharmaceutical Compounding, and not Design or Facility Professionals, which can make deciphering their intended meaning difficult. In addition to the regulations themselves being cumbersome, determining where to get started in analyzing existing pharmacies for compliance can be daunting. Upon evaluating where pharmacies are noncompliant, you then have to balance the need to become compliant with the realities of cost, phasing, and limiting disruption to operations. In this session, the presentation team from Johns Hopkins will explain how they navigated these trials to ensure that their facilities are compliant, while weighing the desires of the end users to improve current operations, and also being responsible stewards for the institution.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Familiarize yourself with the Facilities sections of the revisions to USP <797> and <800> pharmaceutical regulations which take effect December 2019
2. Learn how to efficiently review your facilities for USP compliance, and develop tools to effectively analyze your current compliance
3. Identify key challenges of implementation and determine how to meet them
4. Explore how to manage user expectations, set realistic goals, align those goals with existing culture and future growth

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

F03: Professional Athlete to Weekend Warrior: Facilities Designed to Perform

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Josh Halon, RN, MSN, EDAC
Director, Healthcare Planning, BSA LifeStructures
 
Sean Menogan
Vice President, Facilities, Design and Construction, UCHealth
 
Tim Spence AIA, ACHA, LEED AP BD+C
National Healing Market Leader, BSA LifeStructures

When a preeminent Academic Medical Center, world-class Orthopedic Group, and leading University Sports Medicine Program collaborated to develop a new facility, they were met with the challenge of creating an environment that would move individuals completely across the care continuum of injury prevention, repair, recovery, rehab, research, and performance. The team was tasked to not only provide a wide programmatic need but also support a broad population of athletes, from the weekend-warrior to the performance needs of those in the highest professional categories. This topic will introduce trends in wellness and sports performance facilities including the diverse group of populations that utilize the space. The presentation will identify success factors in designing a multi-use facility that incorporates physician clinics, operating rooms, rehabilitation, imaging, research and sports performance under one roof.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Describe Trends in Sports Performance Center Populations
2. Explore the concept of injury prevention, repair, recovery, research and performance in one collaborative environment.
3. Discover strategies for simultaneously addressing consumer engagement and caregiver performance.
4. Identify Design opportunities in balancing the competitive spirit and comradery with private treatment in a wellness and performance environment.

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

F04: Lessons Learned from 3 interdisciplinary dress rehearsals before move day

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Lynn Aguilera, MSNEd, RN, CPN, PMP, CPHIMS
Director of Transition and Activation Serivces, HTS
Erica Dickey, MSNc, RN, PMP
Project Specialist, HTS, Inc.
Jill Sullivan, RN, MSN
Vice President, Strategic Space Planning & General Services, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford

Preparing to open Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford required detailed planning with an interdisciplinary team approach. Fully testing the facility design, building systems, equipment, technology integration, and new workflows before receiving their first patient was critical. This case study shares lessons learned from executing 3 interdisciplinary, hospitalwide dress rehearsals aimed at staff & building readiness, plus uncovering issues and gaps before move day. The events relied on leadership buy-in and support, thorough planning, and a multitude of resources, all addressed in this session. The speakers share challenges and successes related to managing the hundreds of issues discovered with these events. Issues related to building, operational, and regulatory readiness required frequent, sometimes daily meetings with leadership, design & construction, equipment, IT, furniture, supply chain, EVS, front-line clinical, and support teams to ensure readiness for opening day.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Share lessons learned from multiple perspectives after 3 hospitalwide dress rehearsals aimed at staff & building readiness.
2. Summarize strategies to engage the different leadership teams and gain their buy-in and support before, during, and after the dress rehearsal events.
3. Discuss best practices to manage the hundreds to thousands of issues identified after the first dress rehearsal to 3 months after opening.
4. Discuss the planning and resource needs to execute a success interdisciplinary dress rehearsal before opening day. 

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

F05: UF Health - A Model of Sustainability for Complex Healthcare Environments

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
John Chyz
Sustainable & Wellness Strategy, Affiliated Engineers
Bradley Pollitt, AIA
Vice President, Facilities, UF Health Shands Hospital
Pat Spoden, AIA
Senior Associate, Flad Architects

The new state-of-the-art 540,000 ft UF Health Heart & Vascular and UF Health Neuromedicine Hospitals have a combined 216 patient rooms and 15 operating rooms, including advanced imaging hybrid ORs. Powered by an onsite co-generation plant and incorporating a myriad of sustainable design and delivery strategies, the UF Health Heart Vascular & Neuromedicine Hospitals represent a quintessential example of innovative thought leadership and best-in-class design and delivery on a highly complex healthcare project. In an effort to acknowledge and quantify these achievements, UF Health elected to pursue a Green Globes Certification. Despite the inherent challenges associated with sustainable strategy implementation in complex healthcare environments, the project earned the highest rating of 4 Green Globes. The UF Health Heart Vascular and Neuromedicine Hospitals project is the first hospital in the country to achieve a 4-Green Globe certification.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the challenges and strategies associated with the implementation of sustainability measures on a highly complex healthcare project
2. Assess the similarities/differences between the existing green building rating systems most prevalent in the marketplace for healthcare projects
3. Evaluate Green Globes for New Construction based on assessment areas and scoring methodology
4. Using a thorough case study, summarize the tools and strategies available for practical implementation of the Green Globes rating system

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

F06: Health 4.0 – Developing a new Health-Centric Community Campus

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Bob Gesing AIA
Principal, Trinity: Planning, Design, Architecture
 
Anita Iyenger
Director, Planning and Governance, Legacy Health
 
Michael F. O'Keefe
Director, Healthcare Real Estate Group, Navigant

With the emergence of Population Based Healthcare, the need for an evolved healthcare delivery platform is necessary to better align care with cultural, generational and economic changes. The “management of health” rather than the “treatment of illness” has become the driving focus. Traditional hospital-centric platforms will no longer be the primary venue through which health systems provide care to communities. The new challenges of population-based health require a new model of delivery that involves more than simply new facilities; we need new technologies and a new mindset of care that transforms the way consumers and providers view, deliver and receive healthcare. Legacy Health, located in Portland, Oregon, has embarked on such an endeavor. This session will map the journey taken to explore the long-range evolutionary development of a next generation 30-acre health-centric village located in a community driven by Innovation through such corporations as Intel and Nike.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Investigate "Best in Class" Health Village developments across the US and what components and organizations are being considered.
2. Gain insight into a unique collaborative process used to explore multiple plan scenarios and drive innovation.
3. Learn Options on how organizations can partner with community and private sector organization to synergize campus development.
4. Outline the "Lessons Learned" on how to transition campus plan development activities into tactical next steps.

 

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

F07: Meaningful Transformations in Tight Spaces

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Victoria Navarro
Manager, Planning and Design, Advocate Health Care
 
Geoffrey Roehll ASLA
Senior Principal, Hitchcock Design Group

Renovations on existing hospital campuses can be complicated, especially when the site is land locked and in an urban setting. However, when planned and designed well they can be transformative. Advocate Health Care undertook such a project at their Christ Medical Center campus. Located in Oak Lawn, Illinois, just 16 miles outside the city of Chicago, the hospital was built in 1960 and became a part of the Advocate Health Care system. To better serve patients, Advocate Health Care sought to add a new patient care tower to the campus. In addition to addressing the need for additional beds to care for patients, the new addition required the redesign of the hospital entry and pedestrian connections throughout the site. This session will detail the steps and actions that Advocate Health Care undertook to create meaningful transformations on their campus while working within the tight site.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Participants will find out how to design and plan for renovations within an existing campus footprint.
2. Participants will gain an understanding of how to incorporate safety and security measures into the natural environment on the campus.
3. Participants will learn the best practices for designing pedestrian friendly connections on an established campus.
4. Participants understand the implications of renovating on an established campus within an urban area.

 

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

F08: Emory Healthcare – A decade of planning, An enhanced mobility experience

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Adele Clements, CAPP
Senior Director, Transportation, Parking and Fleet Services, Emory University
Jeffrey Smith, P.E., LEED AP
Project Manager, Kimley-Horn

Emory University's Druid Hills Campus consists of a 15,252 student University as well as a health system comprised of 924,266 square feet of clinic space and 540 hospital beds in two inpatient bed towers. Emory Healthcare has experienced tremendous growth over the past decade, leading to the opening of a 232 bed inpatient tower in 2017. The success of the health system has brought with it pressures on the transportation and parking systems. The University has used strong planning practices to address mobility challenges and enhance the patient arrival and departure experience, while improving the experience for employees. We will explore the mobility components that Emory has addressed, such as transit service, satellite facilities, valet operations, traffic and pedestrian circulation, new technologies, and parking policies. The processes used to support these initiatives, from strategic planning, building leadership support and full design and implementation will be discussed.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Develop an understanding of the trends in competing transportation interests within a healthcare and university setting
2. Gain insight and inspiration on creative ways to combat these challenges
3. Showcase planning and design processes that make project delivery a success
4. Provide insight into how you may use these tools and ideas to address your own challenges and what level of impact they may have

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Track G
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

G01: Improving Organizational Effectiveness with Generative Space and No Capital Costs Part I

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Hospital CEO, Texas Center for Infectious Disease

This two-part presentation is designed to demonstrate the material benefits of using the new concept of Generative Space to dramatically improve the effectiveness of a full range of organizational outcomes with no associated improvements to the physical environment, and – consequently – no capital expense.

The Texas Center for Infectious Disease (TCID) is the only freestanding TB hospital in America.  The building opened in 2011 and has a 75-bed capacity.  It is a program of the Texas State Department of Health.  Average length of stay varies from 6 months to 2 years.  Success is measured not only eliminating the disease from the patient, but also in rehabilitating this individual for re-entry into society.

Part One will be presented by the Hospital Administrator.  Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez has been a Generative Space practitioner for the past six years.  During this period, Jessica has experimented with implementing numerous initiatives to increase the experience of ‘generativity’ for the hospital staff, patients, families, and community.  In this presentation, Jessica will highlight several of these initiatives and provide evidence of their benefits to the organization.

Part Two will be presented by three TCID Administrative Executives.  Each one of these executives will, similarly, draw upon their work at TCID as a model to demonstrate how their uniquely collaborative approach generative care has enabled an evolution away from paternalistic practices.  Each executive will provide evidence of the benefits to TCID that their initiatives have created.

Attendance in Part One is a pre-requisite for participation in Part Two.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                                    
1.  Learn the definition of Generative Space and its unique, innovative qualities.                             
2.  How to measure the improvements that Generative Space can make.                                            
3.  Learn how advancements in TB treatment could be applied to other healthcare settings.        
4.  Learn how to utilize historical data to determine future direction for change.

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

G02: Improving Organizational Effectiveness with Generative Space and No Capital Costs Part II

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Rachel Bauman
, Certified Recreational Therapist
 
Samantha Mezzetti, MS
, Registered Dietician
 
Eduardo Vargas
, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

This two-part presentation is designed to demonstrate the material benefits of using the new concept of Generative Space to dramatically improve the effectiveness of a full range of organizational outcomes with no associated improvements to the physical environment, and – consequently – no capital expense. The Texas Center for Infectious Disease (TCID) is the only freestanding TB hospital in America. The building opened in 2011 and has a 75-bed capacity. It is a program of the Texas State Department of Health. Average length of stay varies from 6 months to 2 years. Success is measured not only eliminating the disease from the patient, but also in rehabilitating this individual for re-entry into society. Part One will be presented by the Hospital Administrator. Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez has been a Generative Space practitioner for the past six years. During this period, Jessica has experimented with implementing numerous initiatives to increase the experience of ‘generativity’ for the hospital staff, patients, families, and community. In this presentation, Jessica will highlight several of these initiatives and provide evidence of their benefits to the organization. Part Two will be presented by three TCID Administrative Executives. Each one of these executives will, similarly, draw upon their work at TCID as a model to demonstrate how their uniquely collaborative approach generative care has enabled an evolution away from paternalistic practices. Each executive will provide evidence of the benefits to TCID that their initiatives have created. Attendance in Part One is a pre-requisite for participation in Part Two.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

1. Learn the definition of Generative Space and its unique, innovative qualities.
2. How to measure the improvements that Generative Space can make.
3. Learn how advancements in TB treatment could be applied to other healthcare settings.
4. Learn how to utilize historical data to determine future direction for change.

1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

G03: Generative Space Award Presentation

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Hospital CEO, Texas Center for Infectious Disease

This program has three elements: (1) a brief overview of the innovative, research-based design concept of ‘Generative Space’ by Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez, a Hospital CEO and practitioner of Generative Space; (2) a presentation by the recipients of the newly-announced 2018 Generative Space Award, highlighting those aspects of the design that are actively generative; and (3) time for detailed attendee questions and discussion about the design and its merits.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how ‘action research’ can be applied to healthcare design projects
2. Understand how to make systemic and sustainable improvements with generative space
3. Explore how generative space can improve lives, organizations, and communities
4. Understand how to make an award-winning submittal to the ‘Generative Space Award’
5. Learn how to design more caring environments with Generative Space

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

G04: Integrating Design and Construction

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Maggie Duplantis, MHA, RN
Director, Clinical Planning and Design, Houston Methodist
Jim Hicks
Vice President, Capital Planning, Facilities & Construction, Houston Methodist
Sid Sanders
SVP, Houston Methodist

Health care facilities are some of the most complex and costly buildings to be built. They are full of expensive equipment, require elaborate infrastructure and take a long time to design and construct. This presentation will review three case studies where speed to market, high levels of quality and long term flexibility were essential goals that needed to be achieved. In order to accomplish these goals a revolutionary project delivery model was used that addressed many of the limitations of traditional project delivery process outlined above. It involves early selection of many key subcontractors and manufacturers and allowing them to assist and ultimately develop elements of the building design. These three projects also exploited the latest and rapidly evolving Building Information Modeling (BIM) to increase accuracy, speed, constructability, long term flexibility and maintenance.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. The elements of Project Integration – who to involve and when
2. How to organize an Integrated Project Team
3. The risks of early selection and involvement and how to mitigate them
4. The value of Project Integration – what an Owner can get out of it

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

G05: How Emerging Trends Influence Successful Clinic Design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Phillip Boothby
Capital Management Executive Director, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics
Luke Leyden, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Capital Management Design Team Lead, University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics

Tight capital, disjointed services, and crowded hospital campuses combined with the desire to improve patient access in a more retail environment are common themes heard in the healthcare industry. Hospital systems are moving outpatient specialties off their main campuses to alleviate congestion. Providing aligned services in a strategic & convenient location allows for a continuation of care. Combining like specialties in coordinated clinics improves the patient experience & bolsters brand loyalty. More health systems are turning to developer-led clinic models, shifting the burdens of design & construction off their balance sheets & expediting the speed to market of these localized ambulatory developments. This presentation will use UIHC’s North Dodge MOB as a successful model. This clinic houses Pediatrics, Obstetrics & Gynecology & Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility services, designed to support patients’ & parents’ from conception to sustained care for their families.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Identify emerging trends in healthcare that can be implemented into design solutions that are adaptable and create quality patient experiences
2. Understand how outpatient services are moving off campuses to both alleviate overcrowding and improve the patient experience
3. Learn how developer partners can add value to hospitals and health systems, and both control fiscal impacts and help expand health systems’ reach
4. Explore how connecting with patients & coordinating care at critical points in their life can both improve patient outcomes & build brand loyalty

12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

G06: Spirit of Place

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKER
 
Renee Kemp-Rotan
Master Planner, Urban Designer; CEO and Design Principal, studiorotan

‘Spirit of Place’ is a journey and exploration to remind us all, as we design places for health and healthcare, that health, spirit, and place are inseparable.  This two-part presentation will: (1) examine the world’s most sacred places for cultural ritual and spiritual healing, where spiritual energy consciously infused into architecture and landscape, becomes magical; and (2) provide an interactive discussion about kinesthetic principles that influence “how we feel and behave” in time, space and architecture.  ‘Spirit of Place’ will provide an inclusive forum to explore a rare approach to design that acknowledges the purposeful nature of well-designed spirit spaces that nurture and heal.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                                   

1.  Examining the spiritual elements of the world’s most sacred places.
2.  Acknowledging role of architecture on kinesthetics and the healing experience.
3.  Becoming exposed to research on design, cultural competence, and social impact.
4.  Becoming aware of the crucial importance of spirit and place in health can healthcare. 

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

G07: Caregivers’ Forum: Issues, Resources, and Network – Part One

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Dana Richards, RN, BSN
Global Healthcare Consultant, Humanscale
SPEAKERS
 
Lisa DiAndreth, RN, MSN, MPH
Director of Quality Management and Research, TCID
 
Matthew Doritty, RN, BSN
Pediatric Emergency Nurse, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Adjunct Nurse Educator, Denver College of Nursing
 
Tamara Roesler, RN, BSN
Medical/Surgical Oncology Unit Educator, Sky Ridge Medical Center

This inaugural two-part session is designed to be a discussion group where issues are raised and resources are shared.  In Part One, a moderator-led, audience-interactive, Panel Discussion will address crucial issues that challenge the effectiveness of healthcare providers in the field on a practical day-to-day basis.  The purpose of the session, and its two parts, is to identify and share those resources that will improve the everyday realities of hands-on healthcare delivery within the current context. 

 

In Part Two, each of the Panellists will be available at a separate table, enabling the attendees to select a Panellist to join for a more in-depth, lengthy discussion about the issue raised by that specific Panellist.  Each table group will be invited to share the highlights of their discussion with the overall group, and attendees will be invited to suggest resources of benefits for that particular group.

 

All session attendees will be invited to join an informal, voluntary ‘Caregivers’ Forum Network’, that the group will self-manage.  It is anticipated that, if there is sufficient interest, this Network will meet at the Symposium in 2019 to continue its session, discussions, and resource sharing.  Attendance in Part One is a preferred for attendance in Part Two, but not required.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                            
1.  How to address common challenges in the point-of-care space.                                                       
2.  The importance of collaboration with all parties, such as clinicians, information technology, design, and high level decision makers, when designing and retrofitting point-of-care spaces.                
3.  New ways to identify, collaborate, and implement solutions that will increase the patient experience and promote clinician satisfaction.
4.  Discuss with panellists from multiple disciplines to develop new understandings of the importance of unique workflows in different areas of the hospital.

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

G08: Caregivers’ Forum: Issues, Resources, and Network – Part Two

Open to Conference Attendees Only

MODERATOR
 
Dana Richards, RN, BSN
Global Healthcare Consultant, Humanscale
SPEAKERS
 
Lisa DiAndreth, RN, MSN, MPH
Director of Quality Management and Research, TCID
 
Matthew Doritty, RN, BSN
Pediatric Emergency Nurse, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Adjunct Nurse Educator, Denver College of Nursing
 
Tamara Roesler, RN, BSN
Medical/Surgical Oncology Unit Educator, Sky Ridge Medical Center

This inaugural two-part session is designed to be a discussion group where issues are raised and resources are shared.  In Part One, a moderator-led, audience-interactive, Panel Discussion will address crucial issues that challenge the effectiveness of healthcare providers in the field on a practical day-to-day basis.  The purpose of the session, and its two parts, is to identify and share those resources that will improve the everyday realities of hands-on healthcare delivery within the current context. 

 

In Part Two, each of the Panellists will be available at a separate table, enabling the attendees to select a Panellist to join for a more in-depth, lengthy discussion about the issue raised by that specific Panellist.  Each table group will be invited to share the highlights of their discussion with the overall group, and attendees will be invited to suggest resources of benefits for that particular group.

 

All session attendees will be invited to join an informal, voluntary ‘Caregivers’ Forum Network’, that the group will self-manage.  It is anticipated that, if there is sufficient interest, this Network will meet at the Symposium in 2019 to continue its session, discussions, and resource sharing.  Attendance in Part One is a preferred for attendance in Part Two, but not required.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                            
1.  How to address common challenges in the point-of-care space.                                                       
2.  The importance of collaboration with all parties, such as clinicians, information technology, design, and high level decision makers, when designing and retrofitting point-of-care spaces.                
3.  New ways to identify, collaborate, and implement solutions that will increase the patient experience and promote clinician satisfaction.
4.  Discuss with panellists from multiple disciplines to develop new understandings of the importance of unique workflows in different areas of the hospital.

NOAH Track A
Monday, October 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

NH2A: Collaborating and Inclusion in Arts in Health

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Marial Biard
Music Therapist, Texas Children's Hospital
Alice Garfield
Artful Healing Coordinator, MFA
 
Ermyn King, MA, RDT
Independent Contractor, ArtStream, Inc.
 
Jennifer Townsend
Program Manager of Music Therapy, Houston Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center

11:15 AM – 11:30 AM Medicine and the Museum: Looking Closely at Arts in Health Partnership Programs

This session will provide insight into how the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston has partnered with the surrounding Boston medical community to benefit practitioners and patients. We will share an overview of two different models for engaging area hospitals, including how these programs got their start, challenges, participant feedback and research. We’ll model some sample exercises and discuss tips on how to implement these programs in your area.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the impact the visual arts can have on patient care and medical practitioners
  2. Gain insight into patient and practitioner interactions with museums and museum professionals including the successes and challenges
  3. Share implementation strategies to start these programs with conference participants’ local museum or medical organization
  4. Participate in sample discussions and activities to gain better understanding of what these programs look like in action
 

11:30 AM—11:45 AM Healing in the Wake of Harvey: Creative Arts Disaster Relief Efforts

In this interactive session hear the story of creative arts therapists and community artists coming together in the aftermath of a disaster to create an initiative directed towards healing and resiliency of those affected by natural disaster. Gain tools and knowledge to recreate this day of healing for your own community whenever there is a need.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Observe how one team built a collaboration of creative arts therapists and community artists to develop outreach efforts in the aftermath of natural disaster.
  2. Recognize key components to psychological first aid.
  3. Summarize the effects that the arts can have on a community during the first year of recovery from natural disaster.
  4. Describe a model of outreach that can be replicated for future relief efforts.
 

11:45 AM-12:00 PM No One Left Out: Ensuring Inclusion and Universal Accessibility in Arts in Health Culture

One in five adults in the U.S. lives with a disability––a prime consideration for arts in health culture. Universal accessibility ensures facility and program access for all, resulting in seamless environments and experiences. This session examines how a systemic inclusion and access approach in arts in health program settings from the get-­go leads to exemplary practice and can set the precedent in this core value area for an entire organization.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. List five benefits of applying a systemic inclusion and access approach in arts in health program settings.
  2. Name four environmental elements or methods that set the stage for or extend the reach of inclusive and accessible arts in health programs.
  3. Identify five arts access services and practices that enhance arts in health program inclusion and accessibility.
  4. Describe three functions of a universal accessibility committee or advisory group established in association with arts in health programs.
 
12:00 PM—12:15 PM Q&A/Discussion
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

NH3A: Arts in Health Design

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Jan Beringer
Experience Lead, NGX Interactive
Jenny Hastings
, Boulder Associates
Eric Rasmussen
Director, Strategy and Business Development, Sutter Valley Medical Foundation
 
Annette Ridenour
President & CEO, Aesthetics Inc
Greg Scott
Gallery & Exhibit Coordinator, Creative & Therapeutic Arts Program, Children's National Medical Center.
Heather Stemas, M Ed, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Art Therapist, Children’s National Medical Center
Kira Stewart
CEO, Art Consulting Services

1:45 PM—2:00 PM Transformative Digital Experiences Within the Healthcare Environment: Design with Intent

Immersive technology, interactive spaces and human centered digital experiences can lead positive change within the healthcare environment as part of the social determinants for health. However, it is crucial to be aware of what is possible, identifying goals, understanding your audience, how to plan for and develop a project, knowing the risks, how to determine success, and where to start.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Summary and examples of technology focused immersive interactive experiences incorporating storytelling, art, space, digital media, entertainment and interpretation
  2. Awareness of transformative applications for immersive digital technology in various dimensions of healthcare from donor recognition to way finding, edutainment, and data tracking of user experiences
  3. Identify common constraints and limitations with the integration of technology from installation through ongoing maintenance
  4. Clarify importance of the planning and development process in all phases from base building to audience profiles to internal/external workshopping to production, integration and maintenance. Knowledge of where to start, the right questions to ask, and who needs to be involved with singular or multiple projects of any scale
 

2:00 PM—2:15 PM A Grove of Aspen Trees: A Community and Nature Focused Approach to Art Therapy and Art Galleries in a Pediatric Healthcare Environment

 

When a child is hospitalized, his/her natural environment and cycles are disrupted and/or fragmented. To the patient and his or her family, the hospital can seem like a looming technology dependent, impersonal and artificial habitat. This presentation examines the evidence-based benefits of Art therapy and nature- based imagery/artwork to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety, and help support the well-being of patients, families and staff.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will specify two challenges that hospitalized children and their families face.
  2. Attendees will identify two challenges to creating Art galleries in a pediatric medical facility.
  3. Attendees will summarize three approaches to establishing successful Art galleries in a pediatric medical facility.
  4. Participants will recognize three adaptations/benefits of Nature based Art therapy for the pediatric medical population
 

2:15 PM—2:30 PM Beyond What You See: How involving patients and staff results in more beautiful, healing spaces

 

Artwork is a major opportunity to make a powerful visual impression on patient experience but is often overlooked. It can inspire, stimulate positive memories and elevate mood. Engaging patients and staff to be part of clinical research, focus groups and advisory teams has informed and, at times, significantly changed the direction of artwork in a facility. We will share project successes and challenges in executing positive artwork experiences.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn which architectural phase is the ideal time to engage art consultants and why this reduces costs and improves outcomes
  2. Identify potential best practices for successful pediatric and senior patient focus groups
  3. Explore ways to apply research findings for optimizing patient engagement and intended responses
  4. Apply findings to inform design, art and future project approach strategies
 
2:30 PM—2:45 PM Q&A/Discussion
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

NH4A: PLENARY SESSION: Research in Arts in Health I

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Francis Bethoux, MD
Medical Director for the Arts & Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic
 
Lisa Gallagher, MA, MT-BC
Research Program Manager, Arts & Medicine Institute - Cleveland Clinic
Max Helgemo
Research Coordinator, University of Florida Center for Arts in Medicine
Maria Jukic, JD
Executive Director, Arts & Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic
Dr. Virginia Pesata
Assistant Program Director and Assoc. Professor, South University
 
Jill Sonke
Director of the Center for the Arts in Medicine, University of Florida (UF)

3:00 PM—3:15 PM The Florida Arts in Health Mapping Project

 

Prevalence of arts in health programs in the US was documented through surveys in 2004 and 2007. A resulting 2009 report is widely cited, but no state-­level data is available. The Florida Arts in Health Mapping Project developed a systematic mapping protocol including systematic search, verification and online survey. The project mapped 107 Florida programs and provides descriptive information that may assist with benchmarking nationally.

 

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will evaluate a protocol for mapping arts in health programs at the state or regional level.
2. Participants will assess inclusion and exclusion criteria for mapping arts in health programs. 
3. Participants will distinguish four types of arts in health programs, as identified in the state of Florida.
4. Participants will assess the value of mapping and describing arts in health programs at the state level. 

 

3:15 PM –3:50 PM Arts in Health Research: Let’s Team Up!

 

The presenters will discuss the rationale for conducting arts in health research and will describe the types of research projects and roles for members of the arts in health team. We will focus on practical considerations regarding research involvement for individuals without extensive prior research exposure. Examples from our own program and other published studies will be provided to illustrate key questions about arts in health research.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify reasons for conducting arts in health research.
  2. Participants will be able to recognize ways they can participate in arts in health research.
  3. Participants will be able to distinguish between types of research projects in arts in health research.
  4. Participants will be able to evaluate required steps to consider when developing research studies/programs.
 
3:50 PM—4:00 PM Q&A/Discussion
Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

NH5A: The Arts Impacting Patient Experiences

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Tamela Aldridge
DC Regional Director, Only Make Believe
Dana Kristina-Joi Morgan
Performance Coordinator of the Creative and Therapeutic Arts Services (CTAS), Children's National Health System
 
Gary Malkin
Co-Creator, Graceful Passages
Lisa Rafel
Author, Composer
 
Judy Rollins, PhD, RN
President, Rollins & Associates, Inc.
David Surrenda, PhD
, Clinical Psychologist

8:00 AM—8:15 AM Can You Hear Me Baby? A Social Impact Theatre Initiative to Empower Parents and Health ProfessionalsFor Healthier Pregnancies, Births, and Bonding

Will provide an overview of a musical theatre initiative created to inspire, inform, and connect community stakeholders to catalyze conversations & support more empowering & healthy choices. Findings in neuroscience tell us that arts-infused experiences can provide a portal through which new perspectives can be effectively communicated & shared for healthier outcomes. We will share results from our initial community experiments in New York State. 

 

8:15 AM –8:30 AM Impacting the Mind, Body & Spirit of Pediatric Patients Via Theatre

Only Make Believe will summarize our various interactive theatre program models for chronically ill and disabled children, integrating imaginative play and educational curriculum benchmarks for children in special education programs. Children’s National Health System will showcase and summarize the impact of interactive performances for patients, families, and healthcare staff.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Only Make Believe will demonstrate how interactive theatre can adapt to and transform healthcare settings.
  2. Only Make Believe will share evaluative results in real-time, short-term and long- term measures.
  3. Children’s National Health System will provide assessment detailing what sets Only Make Believe apart from other programs, how it engages stakeholders, and the therapeutic power of offering choices to pediatric patients.
  4. Children’s National Health System will summarize various arts programming facilitated by its Creative and Therapeutic Art Services Department and its impact on patients and families.
 

8:30 AM—8:45 AM Being Heard: Empathetic Artistic Interpretations of the Personal Journeys of Young People with Serious Illness

Empathy in healthcare settings influences the quality of care. Is there a role for artists in creating more empathetic environments to help patients feel understood? To help to answer this question, two professional artists were asked to create two- dimensional artwork and accompanying narratives based on eight young people’s journeys. This presentation reports research findings regarding the impact of the project on participants and the artists.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define empathetic art.
  2. List the components of an empathetic artistic intervention for young people with serious illness.
  3. Describe young people’s responses to an artistic interpretation of their personal journeys.
  4. Discuss the project’s impact on the artists and implications for the field.
 
8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Q&A/Discussion     
12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

NH6A: Arts in Health Research II

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Marie Carmelle Elie, MD, RDMS FACEP
Associate Professor and Director of Research, UF Department of Emergency Medicine
Max Helgemo
Research Coordinator, University of Florida Center for Arts in Medicine
Dr. Girija Kaimal, EdD, MA
Assistant Professor, Department of Creative Arts Therapies, Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions
Dr. Melissa Menzer, PhD
Program Analyst, National Endowment for the Arts
 
Jill Sonke
Director of the Center for the Arts in Medicine, University of Florida (UF)
J. Adrian Tyndall, MD, MPH
Chairman, UF Department of Emergency Medicine
Tamara Underiner, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Graduate College, Arizona State University

12:45 PM—1:10 PM MUES Project: Phase Two Results of a Double Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Live Preferential Music in Emergency and Trauma

A randomized controlled mixed-­methods study utilizing live preferential music for patients in an emergency and level one trauma center, the trial's second phase with 855 patients demonstrated significant reductions in administration of pain medication, and reductions in heart rate and systolic/diastolic blood pressures that persist for two to ­six hours after the music intervention. Results suggest that LPM may reduce the need for pain medications.

Learning Objectives:

1.  Participants will evaluate a research protocol for assessing the impact of live preferential music on emergency department operations.
2.  Participants will assess the study's outcome measures, including change in vital signs (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate, and pain medication utilization.
3.  Participants will assess the study's Live Preferential Music Protocol, including pathways for acquiring preference in bedside music practice.
4.  Participants will evaluate the value of Live Preferential Music in emergency and trauma care. 

 

1:10 PM—1:35 PM Conducting Research on Arts and Health: Perspectives from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Arts Research on Chronic Stress Lab

The presentation will include perspectives of the funder (The National Endowment for the Arts) and a recipient (Drexel University). The NEA's Arts Research on Chronic Stress (ARCS Lab) has two ongoing experimental studies: a) Outcomes of art therapy for cancer patients and their caregivers and, b) Outcomes of music therapy for chronic pain. The research studies also involve transformation of physical spaces and communities with artwork and music.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The session will enable participants to understand how funding agencies develop research agendas and assess grant proposals
  2. The session will enable participants to see examples of two experimental research study designs
  3. The session will provide examples of validated tools to measure outcomes of arts- based interventions
  4. The session will provide examples of how to connect arts and health research with the community
 

1:35 PM—1:50 PM Challenges and Opportunities for Research and Practice Combining Arts, Humanities, Design and Health: A Preliminary “View from the Bridge” of Creative Health Collaborations at Arizona State University

In 2017­-18 an interdisciplinary team of humanities scholars, designers, artists, health scientists and providers assessed 10 years of systematic and scoping reviews on health interventions integrating design, humanities and/or arts approaches. Results reveal at once the challenges in mapping the landscape of “creative health collaborations,” and many opportunities for ground­breaking interdisciplinary research, education and program development.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Assess the current state of knowledge about health interventions that incorporate arts, humanities and/or design approaches in the health literature
  2. Discuss the ramifications of such knowledge for best practices in interdisciplinary team building and intervention design
  3. Specify the challenges of field­-specific terminology for interdisciplinary collaborative research and practice
  4. Evaluate where gaps in the research literature signal new opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborative research and practice
 
1:50 PM—2:00 PM Q&A/Discussion
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

NH7A: PLENARY SESSION: Arts in Public Health Policy

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Dr. Jay Baruch, MD
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Brown University
Steven Boudreau
Chief Administrative Officer, Rhode Island Department of Health
Stacy Springs, MS, PhD
Center for Evidence Synthesis & the Dept of Health Services, Policy & Practice, Brown University School of Public Health

3:00 PM – 3:50 PM Community-Engaged Approaches to Evidence Synthesis: A Model for Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Numerous studies have been conducted in various contexts to understand the effectiveness of arts interventions on patient outcomes and health care delivery. In Rhode Island, a statewide Arts and Health Advisory Group was convened to create an evidence-based state policy plan for arts and health. This session will outline the process and findings of this group’s work.

Learning Objectives:

1. Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of individuals to conduct research
2. Research methods that support development of evidence maps.
3. Participating in stakeholder engagement.
4. Including artists as essential members of the healthcare team. 

 

3:50 PM—4:00 PM Q&A/Discussion

4:15 PM - 5:15 PM

NH8A: Late Breaking Session

Open to Conference Attendees Only

Please check back in June when this session will be announced.
Wednesday, October 10, 2018
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

NH9A: PLENARY SESSION: Arts in Health Program Models II

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Rev. Gina Bethune
Director of Chaplain Services, Seton Healthcare Family
Claire de Boer
Director, Doctors Kienle Center for Humanistic Medicine, Center Stage Arts in Health, Penn State
Maria Jukic, JD
Executive Director, Arts & Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic
Julie Langley
Faculty Director, Georgetown Lombardi Arts and Humanities Program
Dana Osterling, MT-BC, NMT
Music Therapy Program, Boston Children's Hospital
Laki Vazakas
Artist in Residence, Boston Children’s Hospital and Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital

8:30 AM—8:45 AM Bring in the Artist Stat! A New Model for Patient Care

Julia Langley will discuss new research showing that the inclusion of artists as medical team members opens up a new channel for communication between patients and their care teams allowing for highly personalized care to be delivered. In addition, the arts access the creative and whole aspects of patients, a critically important part of delivering high quality, interdisciplinary care.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn to assess what types of artist encounters are beneficial to both patients and to their care teams.
2. Recognize themes of interaction between artists and patients and differentiate between them to achieve the highest quality patient care.
3. Distinguish what patient information is most helpful to a medical team in order to see that the patient receives the pinnacle of whole-person care.
4. Understand the effects of the artist-patient relationship on artists, as well as patients. Recognize that the work can be at times exhilarating, draining and profound.

 

8:45 AM—9:00 AM Artful Healing: Supporting Life Transitions Using Digital Storytelling and Music

 

When children and families are in a time of significant change, stress, transition, joy, or pain, they are often searching for ways to make meaning of and process their experience. Through art, patients are able to regain control of their story and express themselves in a humanistic way. We will share case studies demonstrating the process of supporting an individual through a life event and how this can be coordinated in an inpatient medical setting.

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to summarize the benefit of creative arts therapies as a tool for coping support and feel confident in disseminating this knowledge at their home facility
2. Participants will learn techniques to support patients and families using music and art-based interventions.
3. Participants will hear specific case examples and have the opportunity to view films and other media connected to patient projects/experiences.
4. Participants will gain insight into ways a creative arts program can function within the context of an interdisciplinary team when supporting patients through transitions.

 

9:00 AM—9:15 AM The Many Blooms of Arts in Health: A look at Dell Seton, Penn State Hershey & Cleveland Clinic

 

Integrating the arts into healthcare can take many forms. This session will look at three different programs ­­ Dell Seton Medical Center at The University of Texas in Austin, TX; Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA; and Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, OH ­­ discuss their programs, structure, and funding. Arts in health programs can start and grow and evolve differently – and anyone can do it!

Learning Objectives:

  1. To describe the integration of the arts into various healthcare systems: visual art, performances, art and music therapy, and arts programming.
  2. To share reporting and funding structures of various programs.
  3. To discuss strategies for implementing arts programming in healthcare environments.
  4. Analyze advantages and disadvantages of the different program models.
 
9:15 AM—9:30 AM Q&A/Discussion
9:45 AM - 10:45 AM

NH10A: CLOSING SESSION: The Value of Arts in Health

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
 
Todd Frazier
Director, Houston Methodist Hospital’s Center for Performing Arts Medicine (CPAM)
Shay Thornton Kulha
Project Manager, Center for Performing Arts Medicine

9:45 AM- 10:05 AM How to Talk the Talk When You Already Walk the Walk: Communicating the Value of Arts and Health Programs to Hospital Executives

 

Successfully communicating the value of arts programs to executives creates shared understanding of their impact to the hospital’s financial wellbeing. This session provides the framework for tracking art programs’ known citations in national surveys to provide executive feedback on the value­ beyond the anecdotal. We focus on HCAHPS and employee opinion surveys. By speaking the same language, we create more stability in sustaining arts programs.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand what data HCAHPS collects and how that affects hospital reimbursement
2. Identify other tracking surveys that may be applicable to one’s own institution
3. Create keyword list of identifiers most likely to be cited in surveys
4. Evaluate art citations to provide data ­driven narrative

 

NOAH CLOSING CEREMONY 10:10-10:45

NOAH Track B
Monday, October 8, 2018
11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

NH2B: Resources for Artists in Healthcare Settings

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Monica Yunus
Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director, Sing for Hope
Camille Zamora
Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director, Sing for Hope

11: 15 AM—11:30 AM NOAH Professionalization Committee and the Arts in Healthcare Certification Commission: Q&A Session

 

 

11:30 AM—11:45 AM Artists Working in Healthcare: Who, How, When and Why?

 

An introduction to professional considerations of visual artists working in healthcare environments. Due to the increased interest and opportunities for artists to serve their communities within healthcare settings, the presenter’s experiences as painter, art educator and independent contractor bring a practical overview to this dynamic conversation about the training and value of artists within the field of arts in health.

 

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the historical contributions of visual artists within the healthcare field.
2. Discuss the distinctions of material use and safety in studio practices and in healthcare environments.
3. Review healthcare protocol and invitation strategies for visual artists within a broad range of populations.
4. Summarize the value of artists’ outcomes in healthcare settings, unique from the creative art therapies.

 

11: 45 AM—12:00 PM

Creating an "Artists' Peace Corps" in the Service of Healing

The "artists' peace corps" Sing for Hope mobilizes a roster of 2,000+ artists in healthcare centers and community sites and has placed 450+ artist-created Sing for Hope Pianos in public spaces for anyone and everyone to enjoy. Learn about SFH as a program model and/or start a chapter in your region to increase creative art programming in your local hospital and/or elder care facility.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Performance element (by internationally acclaimed sopranos Camille Zamora and Monica Yunus)
  2. Best practices in high-level volunteer artist partner recruitment
  3. Best practices in collaborative concert creation and bedside performance management in healthcare settings
  4. Audience engagement exercise
 
12:00 PM—12:15 PM Q&A/Discussion
1:45 PM - 2:45 PM

NH3B: Caring for Caregivers

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Jean Gribbon, PhD
Executive Director, Beads of Courage, Inc.
Astrid Grouls, MD
, McGovern Medical School

1:45 PM—2:00 PM Art in Medicine: Combating Burnout and Fostering Communication through a Structured Curriculum for Residents

Art in Medicine, or AiM, is a resident-run program at UTHealth McGovern Medical School in Houston, TX. This session will explore the growth of the program to further foster a sensation of community among residents, decrease burnout and promote collaboration among the disciplines. It will also explore how such programs may be initiated in other locations and settings.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Recognize the need for resident-oriented burnout prevention and the possibility of doing so with an arts curriculum.
  2. Identify aspects of a successful program that are transferable to other settings.
  3. Utilize existing infrastructure to incorporate the arts into residency training.
 

2:00 – 2:35 PM Arts in Health Workshop:

 I'm Fine (Feelings Inside Not Expressed): Alleviating compassion fatigue through an innovative workshop series for clinicians

 

Professional quality of life for those in direct patient care is a focus area for many healthcare systems. Minimizing compassion fatigue can prevent burnout. Beads of Courage created the "I'm Fine" (Feelings Inside Not Expressed) workshop series to support clinicians. Each workshop integrates the art of poetry with reflective beads to promote self­care and to renew the mind, heart and spirit of the professional healthcare provider.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Assess current needs of clinicians and their experiences of compassion fatigue.
  2. Describe an intervention designed to alleviate compassion fatigue for clinicians.
  3. Summarize outcomes associated with use of poetry and beads as tools to facilitate reflection.
  4. State touchstones that help build a circle of trust for a successful interactive workshop.
 
2:35 PM—2:45 PM Q&A/Discussion
Tuesday, October 9, 2018
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM

NH5B: Arts in Health Program Models I

Open to Conference Attendees Only

SPEAKERS
Kristen Hughes
Director of Arts in Healing, The Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts
Cindy Perlis
Director, Art for Recovery

8:00 AM—8:15 AM Building an Arts in Health Program in a Major Medical Center

 

This session shares the experience of building an arts in health program in a major medical center over a 30-year career. Lessons learned will be explained including assessing the needs of the patients and staff, self-care in an extremely intense setting, creating boundaries, understanding the needs of the patients and staff, and understanding the politics of an institution while recognizing the need for clinical support.

 

8:15 AM—8:30 AM Arts and Aging: Growing Older Creatively

 

For the past eight years, Central Florida Community Arts' mission has been able to create opportunities for artists of any age to connect, serve, and perform. We are proud to present our Arts and Wellness program, in partnership with Florida Hospital and the Winter Park Health Foundation, which includes our Musical Minds choir for dementia and Alzheimer's, and Arts in Action, which provides performing arts classes for active adults over sixty.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participating in the performing arts allows aging adults to socialize with others who are in the same stage of life, and observe, recognize and celebrate each other's wealth of life experiences.
  2. Activities such as singing, playing an instrument, acting, dancing, and telling stories stimulates and utilizes every part of the brain.
  3. The act of "creating" keeps aging adults actively engaged in their everyday lives, and it transforms how they communicate with others as well as gives them the confidence to be seen and valued.
  4. The performing arts provide unique opportunities for physical, mental and emotional growth, which moves older adults from a state of isolation to a place of empowerment.
 

8:30 AM—8:45 AM Warrior's Heart Community: Healing the wounds of war through community- building, ritual, storytelling, and the arts

 

Join The Kentucky Center Arts in Healing program as we introduce participants to the steps of The Warrior's Return Journey, explore the creation/evolution of Warrior's Heart Community-a modern version of these ancient traditions, identify how the arts are woven into the fabric of the process, discuss outcomes achieved for both veterans and civilians, and explore possibilities of implementing similar programs in different communities/populations.

 
8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Q&A/Discussion
12:45 PM - 2:00 PM

NH6B: Arts in Health Interactive Workshops

Open to Conference Attendees Only

12:45 PM – 1:15 PM Creating and Adapting Music in Healthcare Settings

 

Our ability to nurture is our courage to connect.
Flowing with what is happening is a necessary skill when you are bedside, working one-on-one with someone in a vulnerable state. It requires a focused sensitivity and a caring nature.
In this interactive presentation you will be introduced to songs and stories inspired by a desire to bridge that connection. We will explore how the arts open the doors even in the most vulnerable of circumstances.

 

Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Learn simple tools to be an intermediary agent from a blue to a brighter mood.
  2. Harmonize with any hesitation that what you have to offer is warmly welcomed.
  3. Tune-in with a mind-set to elevate the vibe of every room you enter.
  4. Recognize how music and artistic expression ignites the power of imagination, humor, caring and community.
 

1:15 PM—2:00 PM Weaving as a Tool for Social Change and Personal Transformation

 

This hands-­on weaving workshop will model from start to finish how to create a 'sanctuary studio' with any population in transition. No experience necessary. Making art in a community context develops personal reflection and skills training.

 
 
SESSION FOCUS AREAS: = Generative Space = NOAH