Conference By Focus Area

Generative Space
Generative Space Session
Sunday, October 7, 2018

SPECIAL FEATURE

10/7/2018  |  4:00 PM - 8:00 PM  |  Separate Registration Required

ELP: The Generative Space Healthcare Executive Leaders Program

Do you want to distinguish your organization with sustained excellence, without – necessarily – a capital intensive investment??? For 15 years, visionary healthcare and design innovator – Dr. Wayne Ruga, has collaborated with and trained international leaders in the practice of ‘generative space’ (GS).  This opportunity is for leaders to learn this powerful method – directly from Dr. Ruga – and be able to ‘cascade’ its many proven benefits through their own projects, organizations, and communities. This program will provide GS-relevant opportunities for engaging with the HFSE event. 

For complete details click here.

Monday, October 8, 2018

TRACK G

10/8/2018  |  10:00 AM - 11:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G01: Improving Organizational Effectiveness with Generative Space and No Capital Costs Part I

SPEAKER
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Hospital CEO, Texas Center for Infectious Disease

This two-part presentation is designed to demonstrate the material benefits of using the new concept of Generative Space to dramatically improve the effectiveness of a full range of organizational outcomes with no associated improvements to the physical environment, and – consequently – no capital expense.

The Texas Center for Infectious Disease (TCID) is the only freestanding TB hospital in America.  The building opened in 2011 and has a 75-bed capacity.  It is a program of the Texas State Department of Health.  Average length of stay varies from 6 months to 2 years.  Success is measured not only eliminating the disease from the patient, but also in rehabilitating this individual for re-entry into society.

Part One will be presented by the Hospital Administrator.  Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez has been a Generative Space practitioner for the past six years.  During this period, Jessica has experimented with implementing numerous initiatives to increase the experience of ‘generativity’ for the hospital staff, patients, families, and community.  In this presentation, Jessica will highlight several of these initiatives and provide evidence of their benefits to the organization.

Part Two will be presented by three TCID Administrative Executives.  Each one of these executives will, similarly, draw upon their work at TCID as a model to demonstrate how their uniquely collaborative approach generative care has enabled an evolution away from paternalistic practices.  Each executive will provide evidence of the benefits to TCID that their initiatives have created.

Attendance in Part One is a pre-requisite for participation in Part Two.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                                    
1.  Learn the definition of Generative Space and its unique, innovative qualities.                             
2.  How to measure the improvements that Generative Space can make.                                            
3.  Learn how advancements in TB treatment could be applied to other healthcare settings.        
4.  Learn how to utilize historical data to determine future direction for change.

TRACK G

10/8/2018  |  11:15 AM - 12:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G02: Improving Organizational Effectiveness with Generative Space and No Capital Costs Part II

SPEAKERS
 
Rachel Bauman
, Certified Recreational Therapist
 
Samantha Mezzetti, MS
, Registered Dietician
 
Eduardo Vargas
, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

This two-part presentation is designed to demonstrate the material benefits of using the new concept of Generative Space to dramatically improve the effectiveness of a full range of organizational outcomes with no associated improvements to the physical environment, and – consequently – no capital expense. The Texas Center for Infectious Disease (TCID) is the only freestanding TB hospital in America. The building opened in 2011 and has a 75-bed capacity. It is a program of the Texas State Department of Health. Average length of stay varies from 6 months to 2 years. Success is measured not only eliminating the disease from the patient, but also in rehabilitating this individual for re-entry into society. Part One will be presented by the Hospital Administrator. Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez has been a Generative Space practitioner for the past six years. During this period, Jessica has experimented with implementing numerous initiatives to increase the experience of ‘generativity’ for the hospital staff, patients, families, and community. In this presentation, Jessica will highlight several of these initiatives and provide evidence of their benefits to the organization. Part Two will be presented by three TCID Administrative Executives. Each one of these executives will, similarly, draw upon their work at TCID as a model to demonstrate how their uniquely collaborative approach generative care has enabled an evolution away from paternalistic practices. Each executive will provide evidence of the benefits to TCID that their initiatives have created. Attendance in Part One is a pre-requisite for participation in Part Two.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

1. Learn the definition of Generative Space and its unique, innovative qualities.
2. How to measure the improvements that Generative Space can make.
3. Learn how advancements in TB treatment could be applied to other healthcare settings.
4. Learn how to utilize historical data to determine future direction for change.

TRACK G

10/8/2018  |  1:45 PM - 2:45 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G03: Generative Space Award Presentation

SPEAKERS
 
Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez
Hospital CEO, Texas Center for Infectious Disease

This program has three elements: (1) a brief overview of the innovative, research-based design concept of ‘Generative Space’ by Jessica Gutierrez-Rodriguez, a Hospital CEO and practitioner of Generative Space; (2) a presentation by the recipients of the newly-announced 2018 Generative Space Award, highlighting those aspects of the design that are actively generative; and (3) time for detailed attendee questions and discussion about the design and its merits.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1. Learn how ‘action research’ can be applied to healthcare design projects
2. Understand how to make systemic and sustainable improvements with generative space
3. Explore how generative space can improve lives, organizations, and communities
4. Understand how to make an award-winning submittal to the ‘Generative Space Award’
5. Learn how to design more caring environments with Generative Space

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

TRACK G

10/9/2018  |  12:45 PM - 2:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G06: Spirit of Place

SPEAKER
 
Renee Kemp-Rotan
Master Planner, Urban Designer; CEO and Design Principal, studiorotan

‘Spirit of Place’ is a journey and exploration to remind us all, as we design places for health and healthcare, that health, spirit, and place are inseparable.  This two-part presentation will: (1) examine the world’s most sacred places for cultural ritual and spiritual healing, where spiritual energy consciously infused into architecture and landscape, becomes magical; and (2) provide an interactive discussion about kinesthetic principles that influence “how we feel and behave” in time, space and architecture.  ‘Spirit of Place’ will provide an inclusive forum to explore a rare approach to design that acknowledges the purposeful nature of well-designed spirit spaces that nurture and heal.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                                   

1.  Examining the spiritual elements of the world’s most sacred places.
2.  Acknowledging role of architecture on kinesthetics and the healing experience.
3.  Becoming exposed to research on design, cultural competence, and social impact.
4.  Becoming aware of the crucial importance of spirit and place in health can healthcare. 

TRACK G

10/9/2018  |  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G07: Caregivers’ Forum: Issues, Resources, and Network – Part One

MODERATOR
 
Dana Richards, RN, BSN
Global Healthcare Consultant, Humanscale
SPEAKERS
 
Lisa DiAndreth, RN, MSN, MPH
Director of Quality Management and Research, TCID
 
Matthew Doritty, RN, BSN
Pediatric Emergency Nurse, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Adjunct Nurse Educator, Denver College of Nursing
 
Tamara Roesler, RN, BSN
Medical/Surgical Oncology Unit Educator, Sky Ridge Medical Center

This inaugural two-part session is designed to be a discussion group where issues are raised and resources are shared.  In Part One, a moderator-led, audience-interactive, Panel Discussion will address crucial issues that challenge the effectiveness of healthcare providers in the field on a practical day-to-day basis.  The purpose of the session, and its two parts, is to identify and share those resources that will improve the everyday realities of hands-on healthcare delivery within the current context. 

 

In Part Two, each of the Panellists will be available at a separate table, enabling the attendees to select a Panellist to join for a more in-depth, lengthy discussion about the issue raised by that specific Panellist.  Each table group will be invited to share the highlights of their discussion with the overall group, and attendees will be invited to suggest resources of benefits for that particular group.

 

All session attendees will be invited to join an informal, voluntary ‘Caregivers’ Forum Network’, that the group will self-manage.  It is anticipated that, if there is sufficient interest, this Network will meet at the Symposium in 2019 to continue its session, discussions, and resource sharing.  Attendance in Part One is a preferred for attendance in Part Two, but not required.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                            
1.  How to address common challenges in the point-of-care space.                                                       
2.  The importance of collaboration with all parties, such as clinicians, information technology, design, and high level decision makers, when designing and retrofitting point-of-care spaces.                
3.  New ways to identify, collaborate, and implement solutions that will increase the patient experience and promote clinician satisfaction.
4.  Discuss with panellists from multiple disciplines to develop new understandings of the importance of unique workflows in different areas of the hospital.

TRACK G

10/9/2018  |  4:15 PM - 5:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

G08: Caregivers’ Forum: Issues, Resources, and Network – Part Two

MODERATOR
 
Dana Richards, RN, BSN
Global Healthcare Consultant, Humanscale
SPEAKERS
 
Lisa DiAndreth, RN, MSN, MPH
Director of Quality Management and Research, TCID
 
Matthew Doritty, RN, BSN
Pediatric Emergency Nurse, Children's Hospital of Colorado, Adjunct Nurse Educator, Denver College of Nursing
 
Tamara Roesler, RN, BSN
Medical/Surgical Oncology Unit Educator, Sky Ridge Medical Center

This inaugural two-part session is designed to be a discussion group where issues are raised and resources are shared.  In Part One, a moderator-led, audience-interactive, Panel Discussion will address crucial issues that challenge the effectiveness of healthcare providers in the field on a practical day-to-day basis.  The purpose of the session, and its two parts, is to identify and share those resources that will improve the everyday realities of hands-on healthcare delivery within the current context. 

 

In Part Two, each of the Panellists will be available at a separate table, enabling the attendees to select a Panellist to join for a more in-depth, lengthy discussion about the issue raised by that specific Panellist.  Each table group will be invited to share the highlights of their discussion with the overall group, and attendees will be invited to suggest resources of benefits for that particular group.

 

All session attendees will be invited to join an informal, voluntary ‘Caregivers’ Forum Network’, that the group will self-manage.  It is anticipated that, if there is sufficient interest, this Network will meet at the Symposium in 2019 to continue its session, discussions, and resource sharing.  Attendance in Part One is a preferred for attendance in Part Two, but not required.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:                                                                                            
1.  How to address common challenges in the point-of-care space.                                                       
2.  The importance of collaboration with all parties, such as clinicians, information technology, design, and high level decision makers, when designing and retrofitting point-of-care spaces.                
3.  New ways to identify, collaborate, and implement solutions that will increase the patient experience and promote clinician satisfaction.
4.  Discuss with panellists from multiple disciplines to develop new understandings of the importance of unique workflows in different areas of the hospital.

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NOAH
NOAH Sessions
Monday, October 8, 2018

NOAH TRACK A

10/8/2018  |  10:00 AM - 11:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH1A: NOAH WELCOME SESSION AND ORGANIZATIONAL UPDATE

NOAH TRACK A

10/8/2018  |  11:15 AM - 12:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH2A: Collaborating and Inclusion in Arts in Health

SPEAKERS
Marial Biard
Music Therapist, Texas Children's Hospital
Alice Garfield
Artful Healing Coordinator, MFA
 
Ermyn King, MA, RDT
Independent Contractor, ArtStream, Inc.
 
Jennifer Townsend
Program Manager of Music Therapy, Houston Methodist Hospital in the Texas Medical Center

11:15 AM – 11:30 AM Medicine and the Museum: Looking Closely at Arts in Health Partnership Programs

This session will provide insight into how the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston has partnered with the surrounding Boston medical community to benefit practitioners and patients. We will share an overview of two different models for engaging area hospitals, including how these programs got their start, challenges, participant feedback and research. We’ll model some sample exercises and discuss tips on how to implement these programs in your area.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the impact the visual arts can have on patient care and medical practitioners
  2. Gain insight into patient and practitioner interactions with museums and museum professionals including the successes and challenges
  3. Share implementation strategies to start these programs with conference participants’ local museum or medical organization
  4. Participate in sample discussions and activities to gain better understanding of what these programs look like in action
 

11:30 AM—11:45 AM Healing in the Wake of Harvey: Creative Arts Disaster Relief Efforts

In this interactive session hear the story of creative arts therapists and community artists coming together in the aftermath of a disaster to create an initiative directed towards healing and resiliency of those affected by natural disaster. Gain tools and knowledge to recreate this day of healing for your own community whenever there is a need.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Observe how one team built a collaboration of creative arts therapists and community artists to develop outreach efforts in the aftermath of natural disaster.
  2. Recognize key components to psychological first aid.
  3. Summarize the effects that the arts can have on a community during the first year of recovery from natural disaster.
  4. Describe a model of outreach that can be replicated for future relief efforts.
 

11:45 AM-12:00 PM No One Left Out: Ensuring Inclusion and Universal Accessibility in Arts in Health Culture

One in five adults in the U.S. lives with a disability––a prime consideration for arts in health culture. Universal accessibility ensures facility and program access for all, resulting in seamless environments and experiences. This session examines how a systemic inclusion and access approach in arts in health program settings from the get-­go leads to exemplary practice and can set the precedent in this core value area for an entire organization.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. List five benefits of applying a systemic inclusion and access approach in arts in health program settings.
  2. Name four environmental elements or methods that set the stage for or extend the reach of inclusive and accessible arts in health programs.
  3. Identify five arts access services and practices that enhance arts in health program inclusion and accessibility.
  4. Describe three functions of a universal accessibility committee or advisory group established in association with arts in health programs.
 
12:00 PM—12:15 PM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK B

10/8/2018  |  11:15 AM - 12:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH2B: Resources for Artists in Healthcare Settings

SPEAKERS
Monica Yunus
Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director, Sing for Hope
Camille Zamora
Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director, Sing for Hope

11: 15 AM—11:30 AM NOAH Professionalization Committee and the Arts in Healthcare Certification Commission: Q&A Session

 

 

11:30 AM—11:45 AM Artists Working in Healthcare: Who, How, When and Why?

 

An introduction to professional considerations of visual artists working in healthcare environments. Due to the increased interest and opportunities for artists to serve their communities within healthcare settings, the presenter’s experiences as painter, art educator and independent contractor bring a practical overview to this dynamic conversation about the training and value of artists within the field of arts in health.

 

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the historical contributions of visual artists within the healthcare field.
2. Discuss the distinctions of material use and safety in studio practices and in healthcare environments.
3. Review healthcare protocol and invitation strategies for visual artists within a broad range of populations.
4. Summarize the value of artists’ outcomes in healthcare settings, unique from the creative art therapies.

 

11: 45 AM—12:00 PM

Creating an "Artists' Peace Corps" in the Service of Healing

The "artists' peace corps" Sing for Hope mobilizes a roster of 2,000+ artists in healthcare centers and community sites and has placed 450+ artist-created Sing for Hope Pianos in public spaces for anyone and everyone to enjoy. Learn about SFH as a program model and/or start a chapter in your region to increase creative art programming in your local hospital and/or elder care facility.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Performance element (by internationally acclaimed sopranos Camille Zamora and Monica Yunus)
  2. Best practices in high-level volunteer artist partner recruitment
  3. Best practices in collaborative concert creation and bedside performance management in healthcare settings
  4. Audience engagement exercise
 
12:00 PM—12:15 PM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK A

10/8/2018  |  1:45 PM - 2:45 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH3A: Arts in Health Design

SPEAKERS
Jan Beringer
Experience Lead, NGX Interactive
Jenny Hastings
, Boulder Associates
Eric Rasmussen
Director, Strategy and Business Development, Sutter Valley Medical Foundation
 
Annette Ridenour
President & CEO, Aesthetics Inc
Greg Scott
Gallery & Exhibit Coordinator, Creative & Therapeutic Arts Program, Children's National Medical Center.
Heather Stemas, M Ed, ATR-BC, LCPAT
Art Therapist, Children’s National Medical Center
Kira Stewart
CEO, Art Consulting Services

1:45 PM—2:00 PM Transformative Digital Experiences Within the Healthcare Environment: Design with Intent

Immersive technology, interactive spaces and human centered digital experiences can lead positive change within the healthcare environment as part of the social determinants for health. However, it is crucial to be aware of what is possible, identifying goals, understanding your audience, how to plan for and develop a project, knowing the risks, how to determine success, and where to start.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Summary and examples of technology focused immersive interactive experiences incorporating storytelling, art, space, digital media, entertainment and interpretation
  2. Awareness of transformative applications for immersive digital technology in various dimensions of healthcare from donor recognition to way finding, edutainment, and data tracking of user experiences
  3. Identify common constraints and limitations with the integration of technology from installation through ongoing maintenance
  4. Clarify importance of the planning and development process in all phases from base building to audience profiles to internal/external workshopping to production, integration and maintenance. Knowledge of where to start, the right questions to ask, and who needs to be involved with singular or multiple projects of any scale
 

2:00 PM—2:15 PM A Grove of Aspen Trees: A Community and Nature Focused Approach to Art Therapy and Art Galleries in a Pediatric Healthcare Environment

 

When a child is hospitalized, his/her natural environment and cycles are disrupted and/or fragmented. To the patient and his or her family, the hospital can seem like a looming technology dependent, impersonal and artificial habitat. This presentation examines the evidence-based benefits of Art therapy and nature- based imagery/artwork to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety, and help support the well-being of patients, families and staff.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will specify two challenges that hospitalized children and their families face.
  2. Attendees will identify two challenges to creating Art galleries in a pediatric medical facility.
  3. Attendees will summarize three approaches to establishing successful Art galleries in a pediatric medical facility.
  4. Participants will recognize three adaptations/benefits of Nature based Art therapy for the pediatric medical population
 

2:15 PM—2:30 PM Beyond What You See: How involving patients and staff results in more beautiful, healing spaces

 

Artwork is a major opportunity to make a powerful visual impression on patient experience but is often overlooked. It can inspire, stimulate positive memories and elevate mood. Engaging patients and staff to be part of clinical research, focus groups and advisory teams has informed and, at times, significantly changed the direction of artwork in a facility. We will share project successes and challenges in executing positive artwork experiences.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn which architectural phase is the ideal time to engage art consultants and why this reduces costs and improves outcomes
  2. Identify potential best practices for successful pediatric and senior patient focus groups
  3. Explore ways to apply research findings for optimizing patient engagement and intended responses
  4. Apply findings to inform design, art and future project approach strategies
 
2:30 PM—2:45 PM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK B

10/8/2018  |  1:45 PM - 2:45 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH3B: Caring for Caregivers

SPEAKERS
Jean Gribbon, PhD
Executive Director, Beads of Courage, Inc.
Astrid Grouls, MD
, McGovern Medical School

1:45 PM—2:00 PM Art in Medicine: Combating Burnout and Fostering Communication through a Structured Curriculum for Residents

Art in Medicine, or AiM, is a resident-run program at UTHealth McGovern Medical School in Houston, TX. This session will explore the growth of the program to further foster a sensation of community among residents, decrease burnout and promote collaboration among the disciplines. It will also explore how such programs may be initiated in other locations and settings.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Recognize the need for resident-oriented burnout prevention and the possibility of doing so with an arts curriculum.
  2. Identify aspects of a successful program that are transferable to other settings.
  3. Utilize existing infrastructure to incorporate the arts into residency training.
 

2:00 – 2:35 PM Arts in Health Workshop:

 I'm Fine (Feelings Inside Not Expressed): Alleviating compassion fatigue through an innovative workshop series for clinicians

 

Professional quality of life for those in direct patient care is a focus area for many healthcare systems. Minimizing compassion fatigue can prevent burnout. Beads of Courage created the "I'm Fine" (Feelings Inside Not Expressed) workshop series to support clinicians. Each workshop integrates the art of poetry with reflective beads to promote self­care and to renew the mind, heart and spirit of the professional healthcare provider.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Assess current needs of clinicians and their experiences of compassion fatigue.
  2. Describe an intervention designed to alleviate compassion fatigue for clinicians.
  3. Summarize outcomes associated with use of poetry and beads as tools to facilitate reflection.
  4. State touchstones that help build a circle of trust for a successful interactive workshop.
 
2:35 PM—2:45 PM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK A

10/8/2018  |  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH4A: PLENARY SESSION: Research in Arts in Health I

SPEAKERS
Francis Bethoux, MD
Medical Director for the Arts & Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic
 
Lisa Gallagher, MA, MT-BC
Research Program Manager, Arts & Medicine Institute - Cleveland Clinic
Max Helgemo
Research Coordinator, University of Florida Center for Arts in Medicine
Maria Jukic, JD
Executive Director, Arts & Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic
Dr. Virginia Pesata
Assistant Program Director and Assoc. Professor, South University
 
Jill Sonke
Director of the Center for the Arts in Medicine, University of Florida (UF)

3:00 PM—3:15 PM The Florida Arts in Health Mapping Project

 

Prevalence of arts in health programs in the US was documented through surveys in 2004 and 2007. A resulting 2009 report is widely cited, but no state-­level data is available. The Florida Arts in Health Mapping Project developed a systematic mapping protocol including systematic search, verification and online survey. The project mapped 107 Florida programs and provides descriptive information that may assist with benchmarking nationally.

 

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will evaluate a protocol for mapping arts in health programs at the state or regional level.
2. Participants will assess inclusion and exclusion criteria for mapping arts in health programs. 
3. Participants will distinguish four types of arts in health programs, as identified in the state of Florida.
4. Participants will assess the value of mapping and describing arts in health programs at the state level. 

 

3:15 PM –3:50 PM Arts in Health Research: Let’s Team Up!

 

The presenters will discuss the rationale for conducting arts in health research and will describe the types of research projects and roles for members of the arts in health team. We will focus on practical considerations regarding research involvement for individuals without extensive prior research exposure. Examples from our own program and other published studies will be provided to illustrate key questions about arts in health research.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify reasons for conducting arts in health research.
  2. Participants will be able to recognize ways they can participate in arts in health research.
  3. Participants will be able to distinguish between types of research projects in arts in health research.
  4. Participants will be able to evaluate required steps to consider when developing research studies/programs.
 
3:50 PM—4:00 PM Q&A/Discussion
Tuesday, October 9, 2018

NOAH TRACK A

10/9/2018  |  8:00 AM - 9:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH5A: The Arts Impacting Patient Experiences

SPEAKERS
Tamela Aldridge
DC Regional Director, Only Make Believe
Dana Kristina-Joi Morgan
Performance Coordinator of the Creative and Therapeutic Arts Services (CTAS), Children's National Health System
 
Gary Malkin
Co-Creator, Graceful Passages
Lisa Rafel
Author, Composer
 
Judy Rollins, PhD, RN
President, Rollins & Associates, Inc.
David Surrenda, PhD
, Clinical Psychologist

8:00 AM—8:15 AM Can You Hear Me Baby? A Social Impact Theatre Initiative to Empower Parents and Health ProfessionalsFor Healthier Pregnancies, Births, and Bonding

Will provide an overview of a musical theatre initiative created to inspire, inform, and connect community stakeholders to catalyze conversations & support more empowering & healthy choices. Findings in neuroscience tell us that arts-infused experiences can provide a portal through which new perspectives can be effectively communicated & shared for healthier outcomes. We will share results from our initial community experiments in New York State. 

 

8:15 AM –8:30 AM Impacting the Mind, Body & Spirit of Pediatric Patients Via Theatre

Only Make Believe will summarize our various interactive theatre program models for chronically ill and disabled children, integrating imaginative play and educational curriculum benchmarks for children in special education programs. Children’s National Health System will showcase and summarize the impact of interactive performances for patients, families, and healthcare staff.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Only Make Believe will demonstrate how interactive theatre can adapt to and transform healthcare settings.
  2. Only Make Believe will share evaluative results in real-time, short-term and long- term measures.
  3. Children’s National Health System will provide assessment detailing what sets Only Make Believe apart from other programs, how it engages stakeholders, and the therapeutic power of offering choices to pediatric patients.
  4. Children’s National Health System will summarize various arts programming facilitated by its Creative and Therapeutic Art Services Department and its impact on patients and families.
 

8:30 AM—8:45 AM Being Heard: Empathetic Artistic Interpretations of the Personal Journeys of Young People with Serious Illness

Empathy in healthcare settings influences the quality of care. Is there a role for artists in creating more empathetic environments to help patients feel understood? To help to answer this question, two professional artists were asked to create two- dimensional artwork and accompanying narratives based on eight young people’s journeys. This presentation reports research findings regarding the impact of the project on participants and the artists.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define empathetic art.
  2. List the components of an empathetic artistic intervention for young people with serious illness.
  3. Describe young people’s responses to an artistic interpretation of their personal journeys.
  4. Discuss the project’s impact on the artists and implications for the field.
 
8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Q&A/Discussion     

NOAH TRACK B

10/9/2018  |  8:00 AM - 9:00 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH5B: Arts in Health Program Models I

SPEAKERS
Kristen Hughes
Director of Arts in Healing, The Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts
Cindy Perlis
Director, Art for Recovery

8:00 AM—8:15 AM Building an Arts in Health Program in a Major Medical Center

 

This session shares the experience of building an arts in health program in a major medical center over a 30-year career. Lessons learned will be explained including assessing the needs of the patients and staff, self-care in an extremely intense setting, creating boundaries, understanding the needs of the patients and staff, and understanding the politics of an institution while recognizing the need for clinical support.

 

8:15 AM—8:30 AM Arts and Aging: Growing Older Creatively

 

For the past eight years, Central Florida Community Arts' mission has been able to create opportunities for artists of any age to connect, serve, and perform. We are proud to present our Arts and Wellness program, in partnership with Florida Hospital and the Winter Park Health Foundation, which includes our Musical Minds choir for dementia and Alzheimer's, and Arts in Action, which provides performing arts classes for active adults over sixty.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participating in the performing arts allows aging adults to socialize with others who are in the same stage of life, and observe, recognize and celebrate each other's wealth of life experiences.
  2. Activities such as singing, playing an instrument, acting, dancing, and telling stories stimulates and utilizes every part of the brain.
  3. The act of "creating" keeps aging adults actively engaged in their everyday lives, and it transforms how they communicate with others as well as gives them the confidence to be seen and valued.
  4. The performing arts provide unique opportunities for physical, mental and emotional growth, which moves older adults from a state of isolation to a place of empowerment.
 

8:30 AM—8:45 AM Warrior's Heart Community: Healing the wounds of war through community- building, ritual, storytelling, and the arts

 

Join The Kentucky Center Arts in Healing program as we introduce participants to the steps of The Warrior's Return Journey, explore the creation/evolution of Warrior's Heart Community-a modern version of these ancient traditions, identify how the arts are woven into the fabric of the process, discuss outcomes achieved for both veterans and civilians, and explore possibilities of implementing similar programs in different communities/populations.

 
8:45 AM – 9:00 AM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK A

10/9/2018  |  12:45 PM - 2:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH6A: Arts in Health Research II

SPEAKERS
Marie Carmelle Elie, MD, RDMS FACEP
Associate Professor and Director of Research, UF Department of Emergency Medicine
Max Helgemo
Research Coordinator, University of Florida Center for Arts in Medicine
Dr. Girija Kaimal, EdD, MA
Assistant Professor, Department of Creative Arts Therapies, Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions
Dr. Melissa Menzer, PhD
Program Analyst, National Endowment for the Arts
 
Jill Sonke
Director of the Center for the Arts in Medicine, University of Florida (UF)
J. Adrian Tyndall, MD, MPH
Chairman, UF Department of Emergency Medicine
Tamara Underiner, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Graduate College, Arizona State University

12:45 PM—1:10 PM MUES Project: Phase Two Results of a Double Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Live Preferential Music in Emergency and Trauma

A randomized controlled mixed-­methods study utilizing live preferential music for patients in an emergency and level one trauma center, the trial's second phase with 855 patients demonstrated significant reductions in administration of pain medication, and reductions in heart rate and systolic/diastolic blood pressures that persist for two to ­six hours after the music intervention. Results suggest that LPM may reduce the need for pain medications.

Learning Objectives:

1.  Participants will evaluate a research protocol for assessing the impact of live preferential music on emergency department operations.
2.  Participants will assess the study's outcome measures, including change in vital signs (systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate, and pain medication utilization.
3.  Participants will assess the study's Live Preferential Music Protocol, including pathways for acquiring preference in bedside music practice.
4.  Participants will evaluate the value of Live Preferential Music in emergency and trauma care. 

 

1:10 PM—1:35 PM Conducting Research on Arts and Health: Perspectives from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Arts Research on Chronic Stress Lab

The presentation will include perspectives of the funder (The National Endowment for the Arts) and a recipient (Drexel University). The NEA's Arts Research on Chronic Stress (ARCS Lab) has two ongoing experimental studies: a) Outcomes of art therapy for cancer patients and their caregivers and, b) Outcomes of music therapy for chronic pain. The research studies also involve transformation of physical spaces and communities with artwork and music.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The session will enable participants to understand how funding agencies develop research agendas and assess grant proposals
  2. The session will enable participants to see examples of two experimental research study designs
  3. The session will provide examples of validated tools to measure outcomes of arts- based interventions
  4. The session will provide examples of how to connect arts and health research with the community
 

1:35 PM—1:50 PM Challenges and Opportunities for Research and Practice Combining Arts, Humanities, Design and Health: A Preliminary “View from the Bridge” of Creative Health Collaborations at Arizona State University

In 2017­-18 an interdisciplinary team of humanities scholars, designers, artists, health scientists and providers assessed 10 years of systematic and scoping reviews on health interventions integrating design, humanities and/or arts approaches. Results reveal at once the challenges in mapping the landscape of “creative health collaborations,” and many opportunities for ground­breaking interdisciplinary research, education and program development.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Assess the current state of knowledge about health interventions that incorporate arts, humanities and/or design approaches in the health literature
  2. Discuss the ramifications of such knowledge for best practices in interdisciplinary team building and intervention design
  3. Specify the challenges of field­-specific terminology for interdisciplinary collaborative research and practice
  4. Evaluate where gaps in the research literature signal new opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborative research and practice
 
1:50 PM—2:00 PM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK B

10/9/2018  |  12:45 PM - 2:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH6B: Arts in Health Interactive Workshops

12:45 PM – 1:15 PM Creating and Adapting Music in Healthcare Settings

 

Our ability to nurture is our courage to connect.
Flowing with what is happening is a necessary skill when you are bedside, working one-on-one with someone in a vulnerable state. It requires a focused sensitivity and a caring nature.
In this interactive presentation you will be introduced to songs and stories inspired by a desire to bridge that connection. We will explore how the arts open the doors even in the most vulnerable of circumstances.

 

Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Learn simple tools to be an intermediary agent from a blue to a brighter mood.
  2. Harmonize with any hesitation that what you have to offer is warmly welcomed.
  3. Tune-in with a mind-set to elevate the vibe of every room you enter.
  4. Recognize how music and artistic expression ignites the power of imagination, humor, caring and community.
 

1:15 PM—2:00 PM Weaving as a Tool for Social Change and Personal Transformation

 

This hands-­on weaving workshop will model from start to finish how to create a 'sanctuary studio' with any population in transition. No experience necessary. Making art in a community context develops personal reflection and skills training.

 
 

NOAH TRACK A

10/9/2018  |  3:00 PM - 4:00 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH7A: PLENARY SESSION: Arts in Public Health Policy

SPEAKERS
Dr. Jay Baruch, MD
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Brown University
Steven Boudreau
Chief Administrative Officer, Rhode Island Department of Health
Stacy Springs, MS, PhD
Center for Evidence Synthesis & the Dept of Health Services, Policy & Practice, Brown University School of Public Health

3:00 PM – 3:50 PM Community-Engaged Approaches to Evidence Synthesis: A Model for Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Numerous studies have been conducted in various contexts to understand the effectiveness of arts interventions on patient outcomes and health care delivery. In Rhode Island, a statewide Arts and Health Advisory Group was convened to create an evidence-based state policy plan for arts and health. This session will outline the process and findings of this group’s work.

Learning Objectives:

1. Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of individuals to conduct research
2. Research methods that support development of evidence maps.
3. Participating in stakeholder engagement.
4. Including artists as essential members of the healthcare team. 

 

3:50 PM—4:00 PM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK A

10/9/2018  |  4:15 PM - 5:15 PM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH8A: Late Breaking Session

Please check back in June when this session will be announced.
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

NOAH TRACK A

10/10/2018  |  8:30 AM - 9:30 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH9A: PLENARY SESSION: Arts in Health Program Models II

SPEAKERS
Rev. Gina Bethune
Director of Chaplain Services, Seton Healthcare Family
Claire de Boer
Director, Doctors Kienle Center for Humanistic Medicine, Center Stage Arts in Health, Penn State
Maria Jukic, JD
Executive Director, Arts & Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic
Julie Langley
Faculty Director, Georgetown Lombardi Arts and Humanities Program
Dana Osterling, MT-BC, NMT
Music Therapy Program, Boston Children's Hospital
Laki Vazakas
Artist in Residence, Boston Children’s Hospital and Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital

8:30 AM—8:45 AM Bring in the Artist Stat! A New Model for Patient Care

Julia Langley will discuss new research showing that the inclusion of artists as medical team members opens up a new channel for communication between patients and their care teams allowing for highly personalized care to be delivered. In addition, the arts access the creative and whole aspects of patients, a critically important part of delivering high quality, interdisciplinary care.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn to assess what types of artist encounters are beneficial to both patients and to their care teams.
2. Recognize themes of interaction between artists and patients and differentiate between them to achieve the highest quality patient care.
3. Distinguish what patient information is most helpful to a medical team in order to see that the patient receives the pinnacle of whole-person care.
4. Understand the effects of the artist-patient relationship on artists, as well as patients. Recognize that the work can be at times exhilarating, draining and profound.

 

8:45 AM—9:00 AM Artful Healing: Supporting Life Transitions Using Digital Storytelling and Music

 

When children and families are in a time of significant change, stress, transition, joy, or pain, they are often searching for ways to make meaning of and process their experience. Through art, patients are able to regain control of their story and express themselves in a humanistic way. We will share case studies demonstrating the process of supporting an individual through a life event and how this can be coordinated in an inpatient medical setting.

Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to summarize the benefit of creative arts therapies as a tool for coping support and feel confident in disseminating this knowledge at their home facility
2. Participants will learn techniques to support patients and families using music and art-based interventions.
3. Participants will hear specific case examples and have the opportunity to view films and other media connected to patient projects/experiences.
4. Participants will gain insight into ways a creative arts program can function within the context of an interdisciplinary team when supporting patients through transitions.

 

9:00 AM—9:15 AM The Many Blooms of Arts in Health: A look at Dell Seton, Penn State Hershey & Cleveland Clinic

 

Integrating the arts into healthcare can take many forms. This session will look at three different programs ­­ Dell Seton Medical Center at The University of Texas in Austin, TX; Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA; and Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, OH ­­ discuss their programs, structure, and funding. Arts in health programs can start and grow and evolve differently – and anyone can do it!

Learning Objectives:

  1. To describe the integration of the arts into various healthcare systems: visual art, performances, art and music therapy, and arts programming.
  2. To share reporting and funding structures of various programs.
  3. To discuss strategies for implementing arts programming in healthcare environments.
  4. Analyze advantages and disadvantages of the different program models.
 
9:15 AM—9:30 AM Q&A/Discussion

NOAH TRACK A

10/10/2018  |  9:45 AM - 10:45 AM  |  Open to Conference Attendees Only

NH10A: CLOSING SESSION: The Value of Arts in Health

SPEAKERS
 
Todd Frazier
Director, Houston Methodist Hospital’s Center for Performing Arts Medicine (CPAM)
Shay Thornton Kulha
Project Manager, Center for Performing Arts Medicine

9:45 AM- 10:05 AM How to Talk the Talk When You Already Walk the Walk: Communicating the Value of Arts and Health Programs to Hospital Executives

 

Successfully communicating the value of arts programs to executives creates shared understanding of their impact to the hospital’s financial wellbeing. This session provides the framework for tracking art programs’ known citations in national surveys to provide executive feedback on the value­ beyond the anecdotal. We focus on HCAHPS and employee opinion surveys. By speaking the same language, we create more stability in sustaining arts programs.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand what data HCAHPS collects and how that affects hospital reimbursement
2. Identify other tracking surveys that may be applicable to one’s own institution
3. Create keyword list of identifiers most likely to be cited in surveys
4. Evaluate art citations to provide data ­driven narrative

 

NOAH CLOSING CEREMONY 10:10-10:45

SESSION FOCUS AREAS: = Generative Space = NOAH